Climate Adaptation

CLIMATE ADAPTATION

I want to punch climate change in the face. A blog about the interactions between the built environment, people, and nature.


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The “Safe Climate Caucus" comprises 27 congressman and women. They vow to bring state-by-state climate issues to House floor in one-minute speeches. Here is Cal. Rep. Alan Lowenthal speaking on the impacts to coastal California and over 6 million people, July 31, 2013.

singularitarian:

Robot Draws Blood 

I’d totally do this. I once helped a new nurse stick my arm 5 times. She was so nervous and shaking, afterwards she came back to my “room” (I guess three walls of drapes makes a room in a hospital) and thanked me with tears in her eyes. Obviously, my anecdote is directly related to robots.

I completely missed the major flood in Calgary last month. City looks totally flooded my muddy river water. I’m not sure what happened at this point, but I suspect flash-storms, a fast river system (boxed in by old-school engineering), and poor drainage systems. I’ll investigate. 

The Pacific Adaptation to Climate Change (PACC) project is working in 14 Pacific Island countries to reduce vulnerability and increase resilience to the adverse effects of climate change. Go to 3:00 to skip the long intro on water shortages. The video does go over the PACC, shows maps, and various architectural design and adaptation projects. 

reportagebygettyimages:

Trailer: “God’s Ivory”

The ivory trade of today is all about power and elitism,” says Reportage photographer Brent Stirton. Together with filmmaker Andrew Hida, Mr. Stirton and National Geographic contributing writer Bryan Christy examine the institutions that continue to sustain the world ivory trade. A trailer is above and the full 14-minute video can be seen in the latest issue of Reportage’s online magazine.

Mr. Stirton continues:

With the main product, religious icons, being traded for huge sums there’s a lot at stake,” Brent continues. “And it goes all the way to the top. There’s massive corruption and yet, because it’s a matter of religion, it’s not being challenged.

It seems that some people of religion have placed devotion ahead of decimation. They’re putting vanity ahead of the consequences. And surely that’s against the central tenets of all scripture?

Video by Reportage by Getty Images

Religion is driving, in part, demand for ivory. Elephant slaughter continues and not a peep from leaders.

See that teeny-tiny slot near the octopus’s tentacle, just left of the play button? Watch as he forces his way through it and makes an escape. 

Great bike lanes, Indianapolis! And look at those sexy, sexy bio-swales!

 urbancincy:

What’s for Cincinnati to Learn From the Indianapolis Cultural Trail?

When Indianapolis elected Republican Mayor Greg Ballard in 2007 the city had virtually no on-street bike lanes. Due in large part to Mayor Ballard’s leadership, the city now has more than 70 miles of on-street bike lanes, and is on its way to 200 by 2015.

Survivors of India floods recount horror - CNN.com Video

Possibly (uncorroborated) the worst floods in this region has seen. Video shows tall buildings and also cars being sucked into fast, flooded rivers.  Apparently - and unfortunately - there are two months left of heavy rains. Expect more destruction. 

Curious about what the Department of Interior does? Check out this 2 minute week’s update on projects from Latino Youth program in Utah and science based careers; land buy-back program to help tribal nations with self-governance; new study from USGS shows invasive Asian Carp may be more problematic in the Great Lakes than previously thought. 

PBS has a fun series profiling scientists and engineers called, “Secret Life of Scientists and Engineers.” The profiles are meant to charm and intrigue, but don’t expect to be enlightened. Also - Hooray! for all the women in science!! Warms my cold, dead heart…

Above is a clip from a longer interview with climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe. She focuses on alternative energy, and has hope for the future.

PBS’s series is like a buffet of scientists. What I like most is that the producers highlight the researcher’s work and their passions, and avoid stereotypes of lab coats, isolation, and Sisyphean uphill battles against the public. A+