CLIMATE ADAPTATION

I want to punch climate change in the face. A blog about the interactions between the built environment, people, and nature.


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Posts tagged "tech"

discoverynews:

How Big Is The Solar System?

This guy from Discovery is a bad mofo. Check out the above ‘splainer on Voyager 1. Epic.

C’mon. Is this real? Anyone find a link for me?

UPDATE: It’s real! Here’s the video from NASA. It’s not gravity, it’s about charged particles.

(via discoverynews)

U.S. Dept. of Agriculture developing a Climate Super Chicken to withstand higher temperatures. Via Bloomberg

Research study summary, USDA Adapting animal production to climate change.

Tree mulcher. Clears land to build homes, roads, utilities, etc.

New NASA rover explores the underside of sea ice. Click to see more of this amazing robot!

thekidshouldseethis:

Testing a Space Rover Under Alaskan Ice.

Robot/rover floats, wirelessly receives instructions via satellite, and basically “walks” on the underside of sea ice. NASA aims to send one to Europa.

Asker majam Asks:
What are your thoughts on this project? solar-roadways on IndieGoGo site? (no links allowed...) I find it quite inspiring!
climateadaptation climateadaptation Said:

Hi Majam,

Nice to hear from you again. I’ve seen the Solar Roadways project on several enviro-sites and it seems the media is eating it up. They even picked up an endorsement from Republican Senator Mike Crappo (R-ID), which I found most surprising:

Keep in mind, Solar Roadways started in 2009 with a $100k grant from the Dept. of Energy. Solar Roadways already had their day in the media spotlight back in 2010. The now-closed blog Infrastructurist panned the idea as "dubious" and "batshit crazy" based on a few thumbnail calculations using basic transportation engineering standards required to build roads. 

Solar roads are and enviro-media darling, that’s for sure. My take is that there might be a few test roads built, but overall the idea is impossible at this point. It would cost tens of trillions of dollars to build at tax-payer expense. Dozens of policies, thousands of laws, and countless transportation and engineering standards would have to be rewritten (and pass congress). All 50 states would have to voluntarily change their transportation regulations. Not to mention the public objections, lobbyists, and litigation that would add decades of delays.

For those inspired by new technologies like solar roads, you have to answer the basic policy questions: What are the procedures to change transportation laws? How would you get congressional support? What does it take to change one rule (never mind hundreds of rules for solar roads) at your state’s DOT? Inspiration often times has to respond to, and outlast, very serious objections…

Best,

Michael

popmech:

Natural disasters are becoming more frequent, more intense, and less predictable—but technology is helping us fight back.

30 Ways to Survive Absolutely Any Disaster

Hey! We really love your blog! It is great that you are so passionate about climate changes! We would love it if you could check our blog out and follow us! Thanks!
climateadaptation climateadaptation Said:

Interesting and done! From the America’s Amazing Teens website:

The AAT Project is an online competition that will identify, honor and mentor exceptional teens with innovative ideas that will change the world.

http://www.americasamazingteens.com…and check out our zine “Discovering Brilliance”.

Guys, check out teen-inventor Katherine Bomkamp. She invented a prosthetic device for amputees that helps reduce “phantom limb” pain. Really inspiring!

Cheers!

Michael

Back at UMass-Amherst, my advisers asked me to create a sea-level rise vulnerability assessment of lighthouses along the coasts of Maine and Massachusetts. The idea was to create a method to integrate adaptation techniques into cultural heritage protection policies in New England. Pretty interesting concept. Especially since so much history and so many landmarks are located along coastlines. Instead, I did a study of the first tax-payer funded adaptation plan in the world in a tiny city in Denmark.

npr8:

This is what Okinawa woke up to on Monday morning, around 5:30am. For once I am actually glad I couldn’t get my early morning run in!

—Jannine Myers

Interesting disaster notification app. Any followers know about this app? Where could I find more information?

(via npr)

infinity-imagined:

A warmer Arctic could permanently affect the pattern of the high-altitude polar jet stream, resulting in longer and colder winters over North America and northern Europe, US scientists say. The jet stream, a ribbon of high altitude, high-speed wind in northern latitudes that blows from west to east, is formed when the cold Arctic air clashes with warmer air from further south. The greater the difference in temperature, the faster the jet stream moves.

According to Jennifer Francis, a climate expert at Rutgers University, the Arctic air has warmed in recent years as a result of melting polar ice caps, meaning there is now less of a difference in temperatures when it hits air from lower latitudes. “The jet stream is a very fast moving river of air over our head, but over the past two decades the jet stream has weakened. This is something we can measure,” she said Saturday at a meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. As a result, instead of circling the earth in the far north, the jet stream has begun to meander, like a river heading off course. This has brought chilly Arctic weather further south than normal, and warmer temperatures up north. Perhaps most disturbingly, it remains in place for longer periods of time.  

Image Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio [x]

I have a feeling this was taken out of context.

Shoveling Snow Is Way, Way Harder In Antarctica. Via a Gizmodo’s reblog