CLIMATE ADAPTATION

I want to punch climate change in the face. A blog about the interactions between the built environment, people, and nature.


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Posts tagged "space"

discoverynews:

How Big Is The Solar System?

This guy from Discovery is a bad mofo. Check out the above ‘splainer on Voyager 1. Epic.

C’mon. Is this real? Anyone find a link for me?

UPDATE: It’s real! Here’s the video from NASA. It’s not gravity, it’s about charged particles.

(via discoverynews)

New NASA rover explores the underside of sea ice. Click to see more of this amazing robot!

thekidshouldseethis:

Testing a Space Rover Under Alaskan Ice.

Robot/rover floats, wirelessly receives instructions via satellite, and basically “walks” on the underside of sea ice. NASA aims to send one to Europa.

Asker Anonymous Asks:
Hello, I'm an avid reader of your posts on Tumblr :) I was just speculating on the validity of the North Korean "hydro-meteorological service". In the picture, it depicts an image which could've only been taken if they had satellite. Seeing that they were unsuccessful with launching there rocket, where exactly do they get these readings? I think for the first time... Kim Jong Un could be saying something worthy of questioning
climateadaptation climateadaptation Said:

Hi anon!

Thanks for reading and following me! You’re referring to this article, on North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong Un, criticized weather forecasters in his country. 

Actually, North Korea has a space program called KCost. They have satellites in orbit, and Kwangmyongsong 3 is the country’s official weather satellite.

Still, weather data is free and readily available on the internet. It’s a matter of having well trained and educated meteorologists, not really a matter of having a satellite in orbit.

Cheers!

Michael

zoetica:

Tonight’s full Moon has a special name—the Worm Moon. It signals the coming of northern spring, a thawing of the soil, and the first stirrings of earthworms in long-dormant gardens. Step outside tonight and behold the wakening landscape.” Realtime moon image gallery. (Source)

This is awesome.

Antarctica from space. Via NASA.

A NASA satellite snapped this shot today of snow covered U.S. east coast.

The first winter storm of 2014 swept across the northeastern United States on January 1–3, bringing as much as 24 inches (61 centimeters) of snow to the hardest hit areas. The center of the storm was over the North Atlantic Ocean when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired this image at 10:55 a.m. Eastern Time on January 3.

Lines of clouds over the ocean indicate that strong winds were blowing from the north toward the center of the low-pressure system. The winds pushed the clouds away, leaving a clear view of fresh snow across most of the Northeast.

Phytoplankton swirls in water surrounding Sweden’s Gotland Island in the Baltic Sea, evoking the look of Vincent van Gogh’s famous painting "Starry Night." This masterpiece was acquired by the Landsat 7 satellite in 2005, and ranks as one of the top five images from the 41-year-long Landsat Earth observation program.

Plankton blooms like the one seen here occur when deep currents bring nutrients up to sunlit surface waters, fueling the proliferation of the tiny marine plants. This Swedish sea scene is one of more than 150 satellite vistas offered in "Earth From Space," a coffee-table book assembled by environmentalist photographer Yann Arthus-Bertrand.”

chels:

jackcheng:

I came across a photograph on Thursday and set it as my desktop wallpaper. I’ve been staring at it for three days. No, that’s not quite true. I’ve stared at it for maybe a total of seven minutes, looking at it seconds at a time, catching glimpses when browser windows close and open in between work on the novel and a talk I’m giving in Portland next week. You’ve seen the photograph too, I bet. It’s made an appearance on ESPN’s Around the Horn, even though it has nothing to do with sports.

One series of thoughts: How fast is it going? Where does it land? Do frogs land on their feet? What’s that frog thinking, at that moment? Probably something like: ojpifqijovapijwalkjrjpew, because it’s a frog, and frogs are pretty much always thinking ojpifqijovapijwalkjrjpew.

Another series: Rocket launches don’t happen in black, featureless voids. They happen in wetlands. Sudden light heat noise in a place of dark cool calm. The silhouette of the frog also brings to relief to the bits of wild grass threshed about in the smoke.

Man’s ambition. His destruction of the earth in his quest for the stars. The perfect geometry of the heavens. The Vitruvian geometry of the figure; it’s almost … human.

It brings to mind another photograph, taken twelve years prior, nearly to the day: a photograph of a man falling from the North Tower of the World Trade Center. The photograph ran on page seven of The New York Times and in hundreds of newspapers around the world, then virtually disappeared. Until two years later, when it became the subject of Tom Junod’s Esquire piece, "The Falling Man".

But Junod’s piece is really about Looking. It’s about what we see when we look, but also what, when we have the freedom to look, we individually and collectively choose not to look at. And what that says about us.

An analogy for a significant life event. Hopes. Horrors. Aversion. The fear of loss. The frame-obliterating nature of an act beyond routine. One moment you’re thinking about flies from your lilypad in the cool still night. You’re thinking about the book you’re writing and the speech you’re going to give. You’re thinking about how sore your feet are and your wife asleep in bed and the order at table five. And then …

This is a lovely meditation on what it means to really look at something and how it feels to actually see what you’re looking at. But my favorite part is the bit about how this photo is a reminder that space flight starts in the swamps of Florida, and how this one little unfortunate frog reminded us all of how little we are and how big we are reaching.

"His destruction of the earth in his quest for the stars."

Frog.

Via NASA

NOAA retires GOES-12, an important weather satellite that monitored major hurricanes over the years.

NOAA’s GOES-12 satellite was decommissioned on August 16th, 2013 after 3,788 days in service.

From April 2003 — May 2010, GOES-12 served as GOES East, providing “eye in the sky” monitoring for such memorable events as the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season and the series of blizzards during the winter of 2009-2010. After suffering thruster control issues, GOES-12 was taken out of normal service and moved to provide greater coverage of the Southern Hemisphere as the first-ever GOES South. During that time it provided enhanced severe weather monitoring for South America.

This animation shows one image from each day of the satellite’s life — a total of 3,641 full disk visible images.

More on GOES-12’s decom at NOAA

itscolossal:

The Earth’s Seasonal “Heartbeat” as Seen from Space

Note, this doesn’t show sea ice in the Arctic…

itscolossal:

The Earth’s Seasonal “Heartbeat” as Seen from Space

Note, this doesn’t show sea ice in the Arctic…