CLIMATE ADAPTATION

I want to punch climate change in the face. A blog about the interactions between the built environment, people, and nature.


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Posts tagged "satellite"

The London Array is the world’s largest off-shore windfarm. Via NASA.

Twenty kilometers (12 miles) from England’s Kent and Essex coasts, the world’s largest offshore wind farm has started harvesting the breezes over the sea. Located in the Thames Estuary, where the River Thames meets the North Sea, the London Array has a maximum generating power of 630 megawatts (MW), enough to supply as many as 500,000 homes.

The wind farm became fully operational on April 8, 2013. Twenty days later, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on the Landsat 8 satellite captured this image of the area. The second image is a closeup of the area marked by the white box in the top image. White points in the second image are the wind turbines; a few boat wakes are also visible. The sea is discolored by light tan sediment—spring runoff washed out by the Thames.

To date, the London Array includes 175 wind turbines aligned to the prevailing southwest wind and spread out across 100 square kilometers (40 square miles). Each turbine stands 650 to 1,200 meters apart (2,100 to 3,900 feet) and 147 meters (482 feet) tall. Each is connected by cables buried in the seafloor, and power is transmitted to two substations offshore and to an onshore station at Cleve Hill.

Antarctica from space. Via NASA.

A NASA satellite snapped this shot today of snow covered U.S. east coast.

The first winter storm of 2014 swept across the northeastern United States on January 1–3, bringing as much as 24 inches (61 centimeters) of snow to the hardest hit areas. The center of the storm was over the North Atlantic Ocean when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired this image at 10:55 a.m. Eastern Time on January 3.

Lines of clouds over the ocean indicate that strong winds were blowing from the north toward the center of the low-pressure system. The winds pushed the clouds away, leaving a clear view of fresh snow across most of the Northeast.

Phytoplankton swirls in water surrounding Sweden’s Gotland Island in the Baltic Sea, evoking the look of Vincent van Gogh’s famous painting "Starry Night." This masterpiece was acquired by the Landsat 7 satellite in 2005, and ranks as one of the top five images from the 41-year-long Landsat Earth observation program.

Plankton blooms like the one seen here occur when deep currents bring nutrients up to sunlit surface waters, fueling the proliferation of the tiny marine plants. This Swedish sea scene is one of more than 150 satellite vistas offered in "Earth From Space," a coffee-table book assembled by environmentalist photographer Yann Arthus-Bertrand.”

Another tropical storm headed for the Philippines. Source

"Very strong" Typhoon Francisco. Doesn’t look like it will track to Fukushima, Japan.

This huge algal bloom in Lake Erie (that’s Detroit up there) broke out during government shutdown was not being tracked. The federal shutdown closed NOAA monitoring of unexpected health hazard. Read more at Sandusky Register

Triple cyclones pound Asia. Via

Frog.

Via NASA

NOAA retires GOES-12, an important weather satellite that monitored major hurricanes over the years.

NOAA’s GOES-12 satellite was decommissioned on August 16th, 2013 after 3,788 days in service.

From April 2003 — May 2010, GOES-12 served as GOES East, providing “eye in the sky” monitoring for such memorable events as the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season and the series of blizzards during the winter of 2009-2010. After suffering thruster control issues, GOES-12 was taken out of normal service and moved to provide greater coverage of the Southern Hemisphere as the first-ever GOES South. During that time it provided enhanced severe weather monitoring for South America.

This animation shows one image from each day of the satellite’s life — a total of 3,641 full disk visible images.

More on GOES-12’s decom at NOAA

itscolossal:

The Earth’s Seasonal “Heartbeat” as Seen from Space

Note, this doesn’t show sea ice in the Arctic…

itscolossal:

The Earth’s Seasonal “Heartbeat” as Seen from Space

Note, this doesn’t show sea ice in the Arctic…

thisistheverge:

Real-time map of all forests on Earth launches next month

An online map that tracks in near real-time the vegetation area of all the world’s forests simultaneously will launch next month, after a preview was shown at a United Nations summit yesterday. Called “Global Forest Watch 2.0,” the map is a project years in the making led by the World Resources Institute, a nonprofit advocacy group focused on ecological issues.

They designed the map to help monitor and stop illegal forest clearing and deforestation by loggers and ranchers around the globe. “Deforestation continues today in part because by the time satellite images are available, analyzed, and shared, the forest clearing is long done,” the group notes on its website. 

Nice map. Helps monitor illegal tree slaughter. Check it out if you can. 

For example:

  • History of the Space Shuttle
  • Hubble Telescope Discoveries
  • Webb Telescope (Webb will replace Hubble)
  • Dressing for Altitude: U.S. Aviation Pressure Suits
  • Ikhana: Unmanned Aircraft System (basically, the history of a drone named Ikhana)
  • Earth as Art looks particularly promising.

There’s also NASA magazine and an app. Who knew? 

urbanination:

Pearl City, Kuwait in 2002 and 2009. 

Here’s the wiki.

nbcnews:

Tropical Storm Andrea lifts the curtain on Atlantic hurricane season

(Photo: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Reuters)

Most of Florida’s Gulf Coast was under the first tropical storm warning of the year Wednesday as a storm named Andrea debuted the 2013 Atlantic hurricane season.

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