CLIMATE ADAPTATION

I want to punch climate change in the face. A blog about the interactions between the built environment, people, and nature.


about.me - FAQs - Follow - Face - Ask - Donations - Climate Book Store - Submissions

Recent Tweets @climatecote
Posts tagged "reader mail"
Asker Anonymous Asks:
I don't think anyone would expect you to work on both adaptation and mitigation, I don't think that's what the last question was about. It just seems like sometimes you dismiss mitigation as something stupid and useless, which is probably why you're getting a few of these questions. That's probably what some people would like to see addressed; I would.
climateadaptation climateadaptation Said:

Hey Anon,

I’ve been asked variants of this question hundreds of times over the four years I’ve run this tumblr. At this point, I’m moving on from these discussions and I kindly refer readers to the archives.

I also kindly invite mitigation folks to deeply reflect on Kevin Anderson’s work on the realities of emissions, as well as the rhetorical emissions scenarios that politicians and many scientists have bought into. Anderson is the director of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Research, a primary source for the world’s climate science.  

Importantly, see Kevin Anderson’s deeply important emissions reality lecture, here. As well as the revised lecture, here.

Cheers,

Michael

Asker Anonymous Asks:
Hi I really liked your post about what to do with a masters in urban planning. Currently I'm getting my undergad in sociology with honors but I want to get a Masters of Urban Planning or Urban Studies. There are a lot of different schools offering such programs in the US, how do I choose which is right for me?
climateadaptation climateadaptation Said:

Hi Anon,

First, check out my advice for students at the bottom of my FAQs page. Please have a look!

Depends on your point of view - are you into theory or developing your career? If you are into developing your career, think of a masters degree as an apprenticeship. Look for schools that offer real world experience - ones that offer you a graduate assistantships or good internships that will place you in a some sort of development office - a city or town’s planning department, economic development office, historic planning association etc.

Once there, work very hard and cleverly to get onto any project in addition to your assigned tasks. For example, if you are assigned to work on updating GIS data (a cauldron of terrible doom, btw), ask to edit the latest economic development report, ask to take pictures of easements, request to take minutes at planning board meetings (you should show up anyway). These experiences will be invaluable later on (you’ll also be ahead of your cohort).

You must network network, network.

I also recommend working with professors that used to be urban planners and, if you can find out, have funded projects. 

Good luck!

Michael

Asker cuckoomocker Asks:
Hello! I'm a student in Washington, and I'm on my way to get a bachelors in urban planning. After that I'll probably go for a Masters. I was wondering though, as someone that has a degree in city planning, what kind of jobs do people end up with that aren't just city planners? When people talk about getting a city planning degree, they only talk about becoming city planners. Are there any other options?
climateadaptation climateadaptation Said:

Hi Cuckoomocker,

Such an interesting question - what are alternative careers other than “urban planning” with an urban planning degree? There are a lot of options. It depends on your interests and your focus area. During my urban planning education at UMass-Amherst, I studied adaptation of coastal cities. But, I gained a lot of real world skills from graduate assistantships and volunteering - survey design (learn this!), historic preservation, economic growth, eminent domain, city park protection, water infrastructure, even apple orchard design, (don’t go into GIS, btw). From there, I became a specialist in adaptation and now I work around the world (OK, it’s not that easy, but I apply what I learned in grad school on a daily basis).

  • How about fighting wildfires in National Parks?
  • Work with game reserves in Africa and South Asia to protect rhinos, big cats, and elephants.
  • Drop your ethics, sell your soul to the devil and become a real estate developer. You’ll make a ton of money.
  • Or, double down on your ethics and go into international development. Help other countries build good communities.
  • What about historic preservation? Do homes, monuments, buildings, places, etc., need to be preserved for history?
  • Geographer
  • Archeologist
  • Land use attorney
  • Architect

Here’s an interesting job for recent graduate at the BLM $47k to $82k: “Recent Graduate Interdisciplinary (Natural Resources Specialist/Mining Engineer/Geologist”
https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/382973400

There are tonnnnns of options for urban planners. I recommend, for your masters, that you latch on to an adviser that has very interesting ideas and projects in the real world. Avoid theorists (unless you want to teach). Protip: get as many graduate assistantships as you can with various city departments  - then call them “consultancies” on your resume - you’ll blow your competition away come job hunting time. Oh, and apply for jobs 6 months ahead of your cohort (trust me on this, your cohort will turn on you come graduation and are vicious competitors for the same jobs you’ll be applying to.).

Hope that helps a bit…

Michael

Asker Anonymous Asks:
I was wondering if you had any opinions/information on California's Proposition 1, or knew of any good resources about the environmental impacts of of a yes/no vote. I'm trying to make and informed decision before the election. Thanks!
climateadaptation climateadaptation Said:

Hi Anon,

I’m embarrassed to say I’m not connected to this issue. Is it reactionary?

Sorry…

Michael

What non-climate change books have most influenced you? What novels/books would you most recommend to others?
climateadaptation climateadaptation Said:
Hi, I'm doing a dissertation on whether biomimicry is more of a help or a hindrance to architecture. I read your post about it, and just want to know whether you have any examples of where biomimicry has completely failed architecture? You listed Frank Gehry as an example of failing architecture, but from what I understand, he focuses on modern styles of architecture, not incorporating biomimicry. My dissertation is leaning towards "biomimicry is helpful" and i'd like to know how it's not. tq!
climateadaptation climateadaptation Said:

Hi wondererwandered,

I vaguely remember the post. I think it was grouchy and dismissive, and pointed to Gehry’s many leaky roofs and probably velcro.

Gehry’s buildings are frequently cited as examples of biomimicry in architecture journalism, green blogs, and sometimes serious literature (see here), regardless if his work meets even a loose definition.

My general issue with biomimicry is a standard, off-the-shelf criticism: it doesn’t scale up. With nearly 2 billion homes in the world, it’s unclear how a new design based on biomimic design could retro fit so many existing homes. See the problem of green roofs…

Of the articles I’ve read on biomimicry, most are just celebratory blatherings that discuss discrete technologies, like shark skin buildings and spider webs and bullet proof vest. Does the world need these? What would sway me towards supporting biomimicry in architecture is showing that it’s more than a fad for a flashy few…

Cheers,

Michael 

What are the pros/cons to working directly for the federal government versus as a contractor for it?
climateadaptation climateadaptation Said:

Hey dharmathroughkarma,

Interesting question. While I can’t blog about my job too much, I can say that contracting in general is very hard work. Long hours. Demanding clients. Confusing authority structures.

Check out these two posts for more info than I can provide:

Pros and Cons of Government Contracting

Pros and Cons of Working in Government

Cheers,

Michael

Asker Anonymous Asks:
Do you garden, fish, hunt, pick mushrooms and so on...?
climateadaptation climateadaptation Said:

Hey anon, Thanks for the nice question. I wish I had the time and space for these… Cheers, m

Asker Anonymous Asks:
Not sure if you have already been asked this, what did you study to get the career you have today?
climateadaptation climateadaptation Said:

Hey anon,

Yes, been asked a ton, but I don’t mind.

I have masters degrees in environmental law and city planning. The focus of my research was/is how land-use laws were able (or, rather, unable) to accommodate climate science. So, naturally, I’m interested in how climate will affect infrastructure, economies, demographics, ecosystems, etc.

For example, I’m quite interested how can coastal communities deal with a rising sea. Especially cities like New York City or Lagos, which have thousands of buildings, roads, ports, and pipelines literally built inches from the ocean.

Cities are prepared for certain levels of disasters. There are sea walls and evacuation plans, flood pump stations and hurricane barriers. And buildings and infrastructure are generally built to high standards. But, cites are not prepared for higher oceans (why would they be?). Climate change changes the equations and calculations of managing disasters in cities. They’re forced to adapt, regardless of how many solar panels are slapped onto rooftops.

It’s a complicated issue. Greenhouse gasses trap in more heat in the atmosphere, causing a bunch of crazy environmental things to happen. So the obvious response is to stop pumping carbon into the air. That’s Al Gore’s primary message.

The problem with this is that storms and fires and diseases are increasing as a result from rising temperatures. Climate change is occurring regardless of mitigation. Thus, the impacts have to be dealt with. In fact, our troubles are only going to increase. I choose to be on the impacts side of this conundrum (eg, adaptation).

Some other topics:

Cheers,

Michael

Asker cazalis Asks:
First. You ASK is spelled AKS. Might want to check it. Two, what did you think of Al Gore's article in Rolling Stone about the turning point for new hope (star wars pun?) on climate.
climateadaptation climateadaptation Said:

Hey cazalis,

Thanks for following me all this time. The article is here.

Everyone makes mistakes. I think Gore is trying to be helpful and hopeful. He’s trying to support and celebrate, I believe, recent policy changes to limit emissions from power plants, federal procurement, vehicle MPGs, etc. He also points to several disruptive changes to economies around the world, such as Germany’s aggressive investments in solar and renewables.

Several left-leaning commentators think Gore’s piece was equivalent to the word of God - dozens of high-profile blogs fell over themselves after they read his article (see blatherings at DailyKos, Grist, ecowatch).

From my point of view - which reflects the scientific consensus - Gore is spouting nonsense. The IPCC aggregates climate science from every perspective. Their recent report made it clear that even with maximum policy changes, the earth is on track for up to 4.8c degrees of warming. The policy changes mentioned by Gore do nothing to lower global emissions:

[T]he IPCC assesses a large number of scenarios from different experts. For its third report into greenhouse gas emissions, the IPCC assessed 1200 different pathways, created by different modelling teams around the world….

As a result of its own modelling and the different scenarios it assessed, the IPCC concludes that avoiding the two degrees rise means reducing global emissions by at least two fifths by 2050, and tripling or quadrupling the share of energy the world gets from low-carbon energy by the same date. It probably also means using new, untested technologies to reduce the level of carbon in the atmosphere… Via

I think it’s dangerous to say there is “hope” to reduce emissions based on a few tweaks to the American economy. Every indicator (even conservative economists) shows that emissions are going to rise for decades.

Cheers,

Michael

Asker Anonymous Asks:
I was just wondering if you had any advice on how to combat the "but in the 70s everybody was worried about global cooling, the world just goes through phases" argument when talking to someone about the current state of the environment? No matter what I say to certain people this seems to come up and I'm not sure my responses are sufficient.
climateadaptation climateadaptation Said:

Hi anon,

Thanks for your question. I’d send you here, but I take issue with your approach. The burden of proof is always on the person making a claim. If I may, I advise applying the Socratic Method and have a nice discussion (Note: Always apply the Socratic Method with their consent, don’t trick them!).

It is not your responsibility to “convince” them of their err, instead it is *their* responsibility to convince you of their claims. If I say the sky is red, it is my responsibility to show that the sky is indeed red  - it is not your responsibility to disprove it. If you both agree to discuss the matter, proceed without getting emotionally panty-bunched. Hell, you could hold a long dialog that could take days, or even months.

If you are an environmentalist, you have to learn this humble, very effective, and quite easy to apply communication skill. It will serve you well through life.

Once they agree to discuss the issue, define the terms and stay hyper-focused on those things. Every once in a while paraphrase and recap the discussion  - this helps clarify definitions, and it ensures that the other person feels comfortable that you are listening. So, if I’m talking about the sky being red, I’m not able to start talking about my opinion of Obama. Stay on point.

In this case, you’re discussing cycles. So, have them define it. What is a cycle? Is there evidence for cycles? Why do they believe in the science of cycles, but reject that cycles can be changed by human forcings? In other words, can natural cycles be disturbed by heavy influxes of CO2? Why or why not? Where is their evidence? Remember, they are making the claim; you are trying to learn from them. Are they choosing some scientific evidence while rejecting other scientific evidence? How is this possible? By which methodologies are they able to accept the science of cycles, yet reject the science that shows how cycles are influenced? After all, they have to point to science as their evidence for cycles. Interesting, right?

Know that you will experience breakdowns and failures while having these dialogs. That’s OK! Take a breather. Shake hands. Come back to the discussion later. It’s part of the process of learning. Try not to allow emotions to enter the discussion. Don’t get heated. Passion is a good thing, but getting angry and walking away all frustrated is a problem. Face these dips head on!

So, apply the Socratic Method when someone makes a claim. Just have fun with it. No need to be rivals.

Good luck,

Michael

Asker Anonymous Asks:
Hello, I'm an avid reader of your posts on Tumblr :) I was just speculating on the validity of the North Korean "hydro-meteorological service". In the picture, it depicts an image which could've only been taken if they had satellite. Seeing that they were unsuccessful with launching there rocket, where exactly do they get these readings? I think for the first time... Kim Jong Un could be saying something worthy of questioning
climateadaptation climateadaptation Said:

Hi anon!

Thanks for reading and following me! You’re referring to this article, on North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong Un, criticized weather forecasters in his country. 

Actually, North Korea has a space program called KCost. They have satellites in orbit, and Kwangmyongsong 3 is the country’s official weather satellite.

Still, weather data is free and readily available on the internet. It’s a matter of having well trained and educated meteorologists, not really a matter of having a satellite in orbit.

Cheers!

Michael

Hey! We really love your blog! It is great that you are so passionate about climate changes! We would love it if you could check our blog out and follow us! Thanks!
climateadaptation climateadaptation Said:

Interesting and done! From the America’s Amazing Teens website:

The AAT Project is an online competition that will identify, honor and mentor exceptional teens with innovative ideas that will change the world.

http://www.americasamazingteens.com…and check out our zine “Discovering Brilliance”.

Guys, check out teen-inventor Katherine Bomkamp. She invented a prosthetic device for amputees that helps reduce “phantom limb” pain. Really inspiring!

Cheers!

Michael

Asker Anonymous Asks:
I'm so excited to see a climate change professional on tumblr! Do you follow any more environmental science related blogs or recommend any? Thank you!
climateadaptation climateadaptation Said:

Hey Anon,

Thanks for the kindness. For the best list of climate blogs, go to Real Climate, locate “Highlights” in the right column.

My list of climate reads, here.

Cheers!

Michael

Asker kimmehcat Asks:
Dear Mr, cote, this is extremely important..Louie Psihoyos, (founder of the Oceanic Preservation Society) made another documentary called 6, the trailer was just released and it’s clear it will be life changing. Just from the trailer alone it’s clear this documentary is different, I just know it’s going to change the way even non-believers see climate change, and so I wanted to ask you if you had time to watch and share the trailer? I can't include it here, asks don't allow me to include links
climateadaptation climateadaptation Said: