Climate Adaptation

CLIMATE ADAPTATION

I want to punch climate change in the face. A blog about the interactions between the built environment, people, and nature.


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Here's how to become the ultimate Tumblr power user

Say it ain’t true!!

5) The tag limit

This Tumblr rule is hard and fast: Only the first five tags in a post are searchable. That means that only the first five tags will show up for a user who’s trying to browse or track tags on Tumblr. If you want people outside your dash to see your post about figure skating during the Olympics, you need to make sure that “figure skating” is one of the firstfive tags you use in your post.

This also means that if you want to be able to find your own post later by searching your tags, only the first five tags you use will be searchable. Try it yourself and see!

Maybe one day soon Tumblr will list the “first five tags only” rule, but for now, we’re stuck with it. Learn to navigate it—or else be constantly confused about why your favorite posts aren’t showing up under tag searches.

Also, you can post by email! Gahhhhhh!

I caught this Ice-block slide on frozen river, downtown Astana.Borscht soup with every meal. Epic tacky.Everyone wears fur. President billboarded everywhere. Me and a co-worker. Space beach. Rusty boat on frozen lake. Borovoe, KZ.Out for a chat in -20c.

Just back from Kazakhstan. It was a very dangerous -30c (-22f below zero). We (USAID) and the UNDP run a Climate Resilient Wheat program(PDF) for the KZ government. Here are some non-work pics…:)

I’m headed to Kazakhstan tomorrow (working on our Climate Resilient Wheat project for USAID and the UN). It will not be warm. Not even a little bit.

Hi Michael, You have an excellent blog, and what sounds like a really cool job! How did you end up in your field and what sort of advice could you offer to someone interested in your line of work? Thank you!

A question by cardinalpearl

Hi CardinalPearl,

I’ve been meaning to add a background blurb to my FAQs page. I suppose I should do that soon… Basically, I worked for a newspaper in Providence Rhode Island and wanted to be a Pulitzer Prize winning environmental journalist. This was back in the early 2000s. Then, with the rise of the internet, newspapers collapsed and I didn’t see a future in enviro-journalism.  So, I went back to school and got two masters degrees, one in environmental law, the other in urban planning. Both focused on aspects of climate adaptation. I consulted governments during school to pay the bills, wrote and published in climate change journals, and positioned myself basically for the (rather humblamazing) job I have now. A bit more background here, and my Reader Mail tag covers this a little if you’re into digging around

Thanks a lot for your nice note!

Michael

We're hiring!

I work for a government contractor. We service USAID, mostly in the environment, energy, and agriculture sectors. Work is international, and you have to have donor experience. Most positions are senior, but some are mid to junior. Good salaries, good people.

Let me know if you apply so I can put in the good word!

Home office positions:

2014-6416   BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER, EEM 

2014-5995   COMMUNICATIONS AND ONLINE EVENTS SPECIALIST

2014-6170   INFORMATION UNIT MANAGER (GIS RELATED)

2015-6112   ASSOCIATE, COMMUNICATIONS

2014-6114   PRACTICE AREA TEAM LEADER - AGRICULTURAL ENTERPRISE AND FOOD SECURITY

2013-5400   SENIOR ASSOCIATE - AGRICULTURE VALUE CHAINS, ENR           

2013-4481  SENIOR MANAGER, AGRICULTURE AND FOOD SECURITY             

2013-5268  MANAGER, CLEAN ENERGY EXPERT       

2013-3972  ENERGY CONSULTANT

 

Project based openings:

2014-5838  COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST/WRITER, ENVIRONMENTAL COMMUNICATION, LEARNING AND OUTREACH PROJECT (ECO)

2013-5647  ELECTRICAL LINEMAN TRAINING SPECIALIST PAKISTAN PDP       PK-Islamabad

2013-5643  ENGINEERING DEPUTY TEAM LEAD PAKISTAN PDP          PK-Islamabad

2013-5621  SENIOR ADVISOR, TRAINING AND CAPACITY BUILDING                PK-Islamabad

2013-5261  WATER SERVICES & TECHNICAL PERFORMANCE TEAM LEADER  JO-Amman

 

Positions for proposals (looking for candidates to bid):

2014-5840  CHIEF OF PARTY, TIMOR LESTE

2014-5983  PAKISTAN AGRICULTURE SENIOR TECHNICAL EXPERT

2014-5837  MONITORING AND EVALUATION COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR, Rwanda

2013-5417  EVALUATION TEAM LEADER - PPL/LER   KG-Bishkek

2013-5033  JORDAN TOURISM - CHIEF OF PARTY (COP)        JO-*City Not Listed

2013-4597  CHIEF OF PARTY/DEPUTY CHIEF OF PARTY SOUTH SUDAN AGRICULTURE PROJECT           SD-Juba

2013-4601  EAST AFRICA AGRICULTURE TECHNICAL EXPERTS             SD-Juba

2013-4609  ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING AND KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT ADVISOR         US-IA-Undisclosed

2013-3962   PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICER               US-DC-Washington

2013-3964   GRANTS/AGREEMENT SUPERVISOR       US-DC-Washington

2013-3965   DEMOCRACY AND GOVERNANCE/CIVIL MILITARY AFFAIRS EXPERTS      

View from my office, DuPont Circle DC, during the “bombogenesis”.

Watchin this lil guy this weekend…

The Law of Adaptation to Climate Change is a 900 page behemoth. It explores the weaknesses of environmental law’s ability to accommodate new climate adaptation policies, some of which can be considered aggressive land grabs by the state. For example, the question of whether or not a city can ‘take’ someone’s home via the constitutionally permitted eminent domain clause is explored in depth. The Law of Adaptation also covers a few interesting international law issues. For example, there’s discussion of how countries will manage the northwest passage once the Arctic becomes ice free. And there’s interesting reading on conservation of rare species in Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). MPAs are essentially gigantic natural parks in the ocean, usually covering wide expanses of coral reefs and breeding grounds. Fishing and tourism are highly regulated in MPAs.

I reviewed the Law of Adaptation for the science journal Climate Policy. You can get a free copy of my review, here (free for the first 50 people!).

UPDATED with correct link. Sorry!

Happy (late) Halloween from me and my great team!

I’m in Nepal for UN and USAID meetings. We’re working to prevent a special type of natural disaster from occurring, called a Glacial Lake Outburst Flood (GLOF).

A very large glacier melted near Mt. Everest and turned into a mile long lake (Imja Lake). The lake is in danger of bursting, threatening thousands of lives downstream. I co-manage some scientists here (and in Peru) and we’re advising the UN and the Nepalese government how to manage this dangerous situation.

Climate change is causing thousands of ancient glaciers around the world to melt. When they melt, they either disappear via a river, or form a a big lake. Some lakes are very dangerous, and GLOFs threaten downstream communities and cities. The solution we provide here in Nepal will - hopefully - be used as a model by other countries to prevent these types of floods.

Anyway, I will be blogging again very soon! Meanwhile, here are some pictures from Pokhara, Kathmandu, and surrounds. 

Any readers in Kenya?

We’re hiring enviro-contractors (not students, sorry) in Nairobi and Mombasa: government contractors, environmental firms, agriculture, conservation, climate change, natural resources, energy, water engineering. Please hit me up.

We are hiring qualified candidates with government contractor experience.

Hit me up to connect.

Did some beach camping this weekend on Assateague Island National Park… Those hooligan horses are fat from raiding campsites in the night. Tri-pod dog is “Vedder.”