CLIMATE ADAPTATION

I want to punch climate change in the face. A blog about the interactions between the built environment, people, and nature.


about.me - FAQs - Follow - Face - Ask - Donations - Climate Book Store

Recent Tweets @climatecote
Posts tagged "government"
Asker yan-ton Asks:
Hi there! Absolutely LOVE your blog. I have a question about isolated wetlands. What is their current standing in terms of protection in the southeast?
climateadaptation climateadaptation Said:

Hey yan-ton,

Thanks for the shout out. Really appreciate it. Wetlands are important areas that support jobs, animals, plants, water quality, and many other things like human health (yes!). Wetlands are managed by a mix of private property owners (such as farmers), non-profit groups (Ducks Unlimited), and state and federal government agencies.

The US Fish and Wildlife Service (under the Dept of the Interior) and the EPA (see EPA Wetland Region 4) are the primary federal-level managers of wetlands in the southeast United States.

According to the FWS, wetlands:

… provide a multitude of ecological, economic and social benefits. They provide habitat for fish, wildlife and a variety of plants. Wetlands are nurseries for many saltwater and freshwater fishes and shellfish of commercial and recreational importance. Wetlands are also important landscape features because they hold and slowly release flood water and snow melt, recharge groundwater, recycle nutrients, and provide recreation and wildlife viewing opportunities for millions of people. FWS.

Wetlands have several layers of legal protections. The most powerful laws are:

This doesn’t mean that they are safe (they’re absolutely not safe). It means that the public can stop destruction of these important systems.

http://www.fws.gov/wetlands/system/images/ST2009cover.jpg

With that, check out the above report on the status of wetlands in the United States. It’s a comprehensive report that includes climate change and issues of protection.

Also check out Wetlands Watch. They’re a protection group that helps the public access resources on how to report violations, such as pollution, dumping, draining, and illegal poaching.

Cheers,

Michael

Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene is pleased to open its sixth knowledge domain, Sustainability Transitions, for submissions. In this video, Editor-in-Chief Anne R. Kapusckinski introduces her domain.

Guys, seriously. Come meet Jenny Frankel-Reed, Senior Climate Adaptation Specialist with USAID’s Global Climate Change Office. 
She. Is. AWESOME!!!
I co-manage a climate adaptation contract with her office, and I can say she is one of the best people I’ve worked with in a long time. She manages a technical project called SERVIR with NASA, USAID, and several partners around the world.

SERVIR—the Regional Visualization and Monitoring System—helps government officials, managers, scientists, researchers, students, and the general public make decisions by providing Earth observations and predictive models based on data from orbiting satellites.
The SERVIR system helps nations in Mesoamerica, Africa, and the Himalayan regions cope with eight areas of societal benefit identified by the Group on Earth Observations (GEO): disasters, ecosystems, biodiversity, weather, water, climate, health, and agriculture. Via


I think she’s a great inspiration for young women professionals in science!! You HAVE TO COME SEE HER!
Do you want to hear about what it’s like to work at USAID?
Are you interested in how the U.S. government promotes climate adaptation around the world??! Of course you do!
Interested in making connections in the climate change field?
Come meet Jenny for a chat and some drinks August 28th. I’ll be there, too!
Details: 

A Chat with USAID/GCC Jenny Frankel-Reed. 
BAR LOUIE (CHINATOWN METRO) Washington, DC AUG 28 7 P.M.
HOSTS ENVIRO-RUN:
August 28: 7 p.m. – Bar Louie, 701 7th St. NW, Washington DC. (IMPORTANT! Bar Louie is in the mall next to the Chinatown Metro. Go through the white doors on the northwest entrance off 7th Street, by the food carts.)
There will be a place to store bags while envirorunners are on the fun run. Meet inside the event room (Upon entering, turn left and then turn right when you see the back bar. We will be through the big, wooden door along the back wall.)  7 p.m.
Photo op: We welcome you to wear your best enviro shirt + swag and share #envirorun photos on Twitter (@envirorun) and Facebook (Envirorun). Prizes go to the top tweeters!
Speaker bio: Jenny Frankel-Reed is a Senior Climate Change Specialist and Coordinator of the SERVIR Program with USAID’s Climate Change Office, where she has provided technical support to programs in 20 countries and regions across Asia, Africa, and Latin America and coordinated USAID’s flagship science and technology partnership with NASA (SERVIR). 
Ms. Frankel-Reed has worked on the vulnerability and adaptation dimensions of climate change for more than 10 years, including vulnerability assessment, remote sensing applications, climate services, monitoring and evaluation, international climate financing, and training. 
Prior to joining USAID in 2010, she served as Technical Advisor for a German International Cooperation (GIZ) project based in India, was an Adaptation Advisor with the Environment and Energy Group of the United Nations Development Program, and worked as a Climate Change Consultant to the Global Environment Facility. Ms. Frankel-Reed has forest and human ecology research experience in the Brazilian Amazon and Pacific Northwest of the U.S., and holds a Masters from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and Bachelors from Willamette University.

If you’re in DC August 28, please please come see her speak on USAID’s climate programs across dozens of countries.
She’s a young professional operating at a very high-level under Obama’s government. Come see her August 28th. It’s a small crowd, intimate setting, and the atmosphere is very casual! 

Guys, seriously. Come meet Jenny Frankel-Reed, Senior Climate Adaptation Specialist with USAID’s Global Climate Change Office.

She. Is. AWESOME!!!

I co-manage a climate adaptation contract with her office, and I can say she is one of the best people I’ve worked with in a long time. She manages a technical project called SERVIR with NASA, USAID, and several partners around the world.

SERVIR—the Regional Visualization and Monitoring System—helps government officials, managers, scientists, researchers, students, and the general public make decisions by providing Earth observations and predictive models based on data from orbiting satellites.

The SERVIR system helps nations in Mesoamerica, Africa, and the Himalayan regions cope with eight areas of societal benefit identified by the Group on Earth Observations (GEO): disasters, ecosystems, biodiversity, weather, water, climate, health, and agriculture. Via

I think she’s a great inspiration for young women professionals in science!! You HAVE TO COME SEE HER!

  • Do you want to hear about what it’s like to work at USAID?
  • Are you interested in how the U.S. government promotes climate adaptation around the world??! Of course you do!
  • Interested in making connections in the climate change field?
  • Come meet Jenny for a chat and some drinks August 28th. I’ll be there, too!

Details:

A Chat with USAID/GCC Jenny Frankel-Reed.

BAR LOUIE (CHINATOWN METRO) Washington, DC AUG 28 7 P.M.

HOSTS ENVIRO-RUN:

August 28: 7 p.m. – Bar Louie, 701 7th St. NW, Washington DC. (IMPORTANT! Bar Louie is in the mall next to the Chinatown Metro. Go through the white doors on the northwest entrance off 7th Street, by the food carts.)

There will be a place to store bags while envirorunners are on the fun run. Meet inside the event room (Upon entering, turn left and then turn right when you see the back bar. We will be through the big, wooden door along the back wall.)  7 p.m.

Photo op: We welcome you to wear your best enviro shirt + swag and share #envirorun photos on Twitter (@envirorun) and Facebook (Envirorun). Prizes go to the top tweeters!

Speaker bio: Jenny Frankel-Reed is a Senior Climate Change Specialist and Coordinator of the SERVIR Program with USAID’s Climate Change Office, where she has provided technical support to programs in 20 countries and regions across Asia, Africa, and Latin America and coordinated USAID’s flagship science and technology partnership with NASA (SERVIR).

Ms. Frankel-Reed has worked on the vulnerability and adaptation dimensions of climate change for more than 10 years, including vulnerability assessment, remote sensing applications, climate services, monitoring and evaluation, international climate financing, and training.

Prior to joining USAID in 2010, she served as Technical Advisor for a German International Cooperation (GIZ) project based in India, was an Adaptation Advisor with the Environment and Energy Group of the United Nations Development Program, and worked as a Climate Change Consultant to the Global Environment Facility. Ms. Frankel-Reed has forest and human ecology research experience in the Brazilian Amazon and Pacific Northwest of the U.S., and holds a Masters from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and Bachelors from Willamette University.

If you’re in DC August 28, please please come see her speak on USAID’s climate programs across dozens of countries.

She’s a young professional operating at a very high-level under Obama’s government. Come see her August 28th. It’s a small crowd, intimate setting, and the atmosphere is very casual! 

I did not know the White House’s solar panels were made in the USA.

I actually work on numbers 1, 2, 3, and 7 under my current USAID contract. In fact, I just got back from Vietnam for meetings with governments on our climate change adaptation and urban planning project. 

Interesting that the investigators found that “authorities and security forces” (e.g., government) are complicit. I wonder how they found this information (or if they assumed it)?Anyone have this report? If so, can you kindly send it to me?

I work for a government contractor. We service USAID, mostly in the environment, energy, and agriculture sectors. Work is international, and you have to have donor experience. Most positions are senior, but some are mid to junior. Good salaries, good people.

Let me know if you apply so I can put in the good word!

Home office positions:

2014-6416   BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER, EEM 

2014-5995   COMMUNICATIONS AND ONLINE EVENTS SPECIALIST

2014-6170   INFORMATION UNIT MANAGER (GIS RELATED)

2015-6112   ASSOCIATE, COMMUNICATIONS

2014-6114   PRACTICE AREA TEAM LEADER - AGRICULTURAL ENTERPRISE AND FOOD SECURITY

2013-5400   SENIOR ASSOCIATE - AGRICULTURE VALUE CHAINS, ENR           

2013-4481  SENIOR MANAGER, AGRICULTURE AND FOOD SECURITY             

2013-5268  MANAGER, CLEAN ENERGY EXPERT       

2013-3972  ENERGY CONSULTANT

 

Project based openings:

2014-5838  COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST/WRITER, ENVIRONMENTAL COMMUNICATION, LEARNING AND OUTREACH PROJECT (ECO)

2013-5647  ELECTRICAL LINEMAN TRAINING SPECIALIST PAKISTAN PDP       PK-Islamabad

2013-5643  ENGINEERING DEPUTY TEAM LEAD PAKISTAN PDP          PK-Islamabad

2013-5621  SENIOR ADVISOR, TRAINING AND CAPACITY BUILDING                PK-Islamabad

2013-5261  WATER SERVICES & TECHNICAL PERFORMANCE TEAM LEADER  JO-Amman

 

Positions for proposals (looking for candidates to bid):

2014-5840  CHIEF OF PARTY, TIMOR LESTE

2014-5983  PAKISTAN AGRICULTURE SENIOR TECHNICAL EXPERT

2014-5837  MONITORING AND EVALUATION COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR, Rwanda

2013-5417  EVALUATION TEAM LEADER - PPL/LER   KG-Bishkek

2013-5033  JORDAN TOURISM - CHIEF OF PARTY (COP)        JO-*City Not Listed

2013-4597  CHIEF OF PARTY/DEPUTY CHIEF OF PARTY SOUTH SUDAN AGRICULTURE PROJECT           SD-Juba

2013-4601  EAST AFRICA AGRICULTURE TECHNICAL EXPERTS             SD-Juba

2013-4609  ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING AND KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT ADVISOR         US-IA-Undisclosed

2013-3962   PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICER               US-DC-Washington

2013-3964   GRANTS/AGREEMENT SUPERVISOR       US-DC-Washington

2013-3965   DEMOCRACY AND GOVERNANCE/CIVIL MILITARY AFFAIRS EXPERTS      

More than $100 million in cuts are underway at the federal department in charge of protecting Canada’s water and oceans, despite recommendations from top bureaucrats that it needs to increase spending for both environmental and economic reasons.

According to internal federal briefing notes obtained by Postmedia News, Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s government is eliminating about 500 jobs at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans related to Coast Guard services, patrols to stop illegal fishing activities as well as scientific research to promote conservation, protect endangered species, and prevent industrial water pollution.

The cuts, part of the federal government’s efforts to eliminate its deficit, cover 26 different areas of the department which has a workforce of about 10,000 employees. The downsizing also includes the shutdown of federal libraries and millions of dollars in reductions to climate change adaptation programs. In total, the department estimates it will cut about $80 million per year from its budget by 2014-15, and over $100 million per year in the following fiscal year.

Harper’s ultra-conservative government also makes oil and gas spill clean up plans secret. It seems Harper was but a martyr for the oil and gas industry, having nearly wiped out most of Canada’s environmental regulations and policies that affect oil and gas drilling.

A: By incorporating climate science into environmental regulations. The EPA recently published 17 adaptation plans for various environmental regulatory offices in the U.S. These plans affect the quality of our water and air, reduce chemical waste in the environment, and improve government employee knowledge on climate science. Note that in 2010, and 2013 President Obama signed executive orders requiring all of the Federal Government to implement adaptation plans based on climate science. Here’s the EPA’s list of plans. Each agency will have their own adaptation plans, and I’ll post those as I receive them.

Check out the plans if you can! They’re free and easy to read. 

EPA Adaptation Implementation Plans

In early November, 2013 EPA released 17 Program and Regional Adaptation Implementation Plans for a 60 day public comment period. The public is invited to review and provide comment on the draft Implementation Plans through the public docket at www.regulations.gov (Docket Number EPA-HQ-OA-2013-0568). The docket will open as soon as the Federal Register Notice is published. If you are providing comments through the public docket, it is important to identify which of the 17 Plans your comments refer to. Thank you for your interest and assistance.

These draft Implementation Plans were prepared by EPA’s Program and Regional Offices following the February 2013 publication of the Draft Climate Change Adaptation Plan (PDF). The 17 plans included here are part of an ongoing effort to address adaptation across the federal government, in response to Executive Order 13514 - “Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance.” (PDF)

Program Implementation Plans

Regional Office Implementation Plans

Related to Obama’s voracious support for ethanol. See my earlier post on how the president’s policies supporting ethanol fuel is devastating conservation land across the United States.

COP 19

Day  Calendar of side events
Subscribe  Warsaw 1  Forward this email to a friend   

 
British Council climate champion, Jelena Kiselova, summarises the achievements of COP 18 and highlights the key issues for attention over the coming two weeks of COP 19.
 
 
 ‘Nudge’ insights could prove useful when negotiating the legal architecture for the 2015 climate agreement argues Joy Hyvarinen from FIELD.
 
Benito Müller and Niklas Höhne present the benefits of taking a staged approach to negotiating new mitigation commitments under the Durban Platform processes.
Athena Ballesteros from WRI summarises key messages from the UNFCCC’s work-programme on long-term finance and discusses their significance for COP 19
 
A global approach to emissions trading is needed to successfully tackle the carbon emissions from the aviation and shipping industries, argues Rafael Leal-Arcas from Queen Mary University of London.
Anette Friis from Danish Agriculture and Food Council explains how a new resource hopes to help COP 19 participants better understand the relationship between climate change and agriculture.
 
UNDP India’s Dhanapal G reveals the connection between India’s increasing energy efficiency and growth in renewables, and UNFCCC financial mechanisms.
YOUNGO Focal Points Liang-Yi Chang and Jamie Peters recall the events of last week’s Conference of Youth, which saw hundreds of young people gather to prepare for COP 19.

An Executive Order to Protect Our Communities

The Obama Administration has taken significant steps to strengthen the climate resilience of America’s communities and economy.  More than 30 Federal agencies developed their first-ever Climate Change Adaptation Plans, outlining strategies to protect their operations, programs, and investments to better serve communities and safeguard our public resources in the face of climate change.  In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, the Administration has provided resources to rebuild the affected area to be more resilient than before, including support for more climate-resilient roads and infrastructure, and projects that protect drinking water and buffer communities from flooding.  In addition, Federal agencies have partnered with states, cities, tribes, and the private sector to develop strategies to address the impacts of climate change on our freshwater resources, oceans and coasts, and wildlife. Agencies have also built new, data-driven tools to help decision makers and resource managers map and plan for future sea level rise. From Florida to Minnesota, and from Alaska to New York, Federal agencies have partnered with communities to provide funding and technical assistance to address local climate impacts such as sea level rise, flooding, and water scarcity.

To build on this progress, the Executive Order (E.O.) “Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change,” signed today directs Federal agencies to:

  • Modernize Federal programs to support climate-resilient investments: Agencies will examine their policies and programs and find ways to make it easier for cities and towns to build smarter and stronger. Agencies will identify and remove any barriers to resilience-focused actions and investments– for example, policies that encourage communities to rebuild to past standards after disasters instead of to stronger standards – including through agency grants, technical assistance, and other programs in sectors from transportation and water management to conservation and disaster relief.
  • Manage lands and waters for climate preparedness and resilience: America’s natural resources are critical to our Nation’s economy, health and quality of life.  The E.O. directs agencies to identify changes that must be made to land- and water-related policies, programs, and regulations to strengthen the climate resilience of our watersheds, natural resources, and ecosystems, and the communities and economies that depend on them. Federal agencies will also evaluate how to better promote natural storm barriers such as dunes and wetlands, as well as how to protect the carbon sequestration benefits of forests and lands to help reduce the carbon pollution that causes climate change. 
  • Provide information, data and tools for climate change preparedness and resilience: Scientific data and insights are essential to help communities and businesses better understand and manage the risks associated with extreme weather and other impacts of climate change.  The E.O. instructs Federal agencies to work together and with information users to develop new climate preparedness tools and information that state, local, and private-sector leaders need to make smart decisions.  In keeping with the President’s Open Data initiative, agencies will also make extensive Federal climate data accessible to the public through an easy-to-use online portal.
  • Plan for climate change related risk: Recognizing the threat that climate change poses to Federal facilities, operations and programs, the E.O. builds on the first-ever set of Federal agency adaptation plans released earlier this year and directs Federal agencies to develop and implement strategies to evaluate and address their most significant climate change related risks.  

To implement these actions, the E.O. establishes an interagency Council on Climate Preparedness and Resilience, chaired by the White House and composed of more than 25 agencies. To assist in achieving the goals of the E.O., these agencies are directed to consider the recommendations of the State, Local, and Tribal Leaders Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience.”

Read the FACT SHEET, here

President Obama issues new Executive Order, “Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change." The new EO, issued November 1st, directs the agencies to

1) Federal infrastructure spending will have to take climate into account. Agencies are supposed to examine their policies and find ways to help states prepare for the effects of climate change.

So, for example, federal disaster-relief programs that help coastal communities rebuild after a storm or flood will have to take into account the possibility that the next storm or flood could be even worse. Likewise, roads and bridges built with federal money will have to be planned with changing climate conditions — such as future sea-level rise — in mind.

2) Water- and land- management will get revamped. Agencies like the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Interior will have to review their land- and water-management policies to take shifting conditions into account.

For example, agencies will have to ”evaluate how to better promote natural storm barriers such as dunes and wetlands” and figure out “how to protect the carbon sequestration benefits of forests and lands to help reduce the carbon pollution that causes climate change.” (The EPA has already released its plans to this effect.)

3) The federal government will try to provide better data on what climate impacts are actually coming. As part of the executive order, federal agencies are supposed to offer better information “that state, local, and private-sector leaders need to make smart decisions.” - WaPo

It’s an integrative approach, folding climate science and data into decision making at the federal level. Each agency was directed to create an adaptation policy back in 2011. Now the agencies have to implement their plans and use the National Climate Assessment and other findings from peer-reviewed climate scientists. This new EO builds upon several(!) orders by the President, including Executive Order 13514, which I wrote about here.

Secretary Jewell personally welcomes back furloughed employees from Dept. of Interior.

70,000 Interior employees are back on the job, as national parks, wildlife refuges, public lands, energy bureaus, and BIA offices begin to re-open.