CLIMATE ADAPTATION

I want to punch climate change in the face. A blog about the interactions between the built environment, people, and nature.


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Posts tagged "disaster porn"

kqedscience:

A humbling map of real-time wind patterns in Tornado Alley

“Wind Map” is a stunning interactive datavisualization that presents wind patterns across the continental U.S. in real time. Picture above is what it looked like last night at 10:59 CDT, in the aftermath of yesterday’s devastating Oklahoma tornado.”

Read more here from io9.

bobbycaputo:

Heat, high wind create ‘catastrophic’ fire condition in Australia

Firefighters battled scores of wildfires raging across southeast Australia on Tuesday as authorities evacuated national parks and warned that record-level, blistering temperatures and high winds had led to “catastrophic” conditions in some areas.

“We are shaping up for one of the worst fire danger days on record,” New South Wales Rural Fire Service Commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons said. “You don’t get conditions worse than this. We are at the catastrophic level and clearly in those areas leaving early is your safest option.”

Catastrophic threat level is the most severe rating applicable.

Firefighters hope cooler weather sweeping up the Australian east coast late Tuesday, which dramatically dropped temperatures in a matter of hours in some coastal towns, would ease the incendiary conditions. Monday was the hottest day on record for Australia, with the average temperature across the continent reaching 104.6 degrees F., Australia’s 7 News network reported

(Continue Reading)

BP well probably still leaking in the Gulf of Mexico. The excellent tumblr energygasandoil discovered this diligent reporting by CBS. They interview Congressman Ed Markey (D-MA), who led the original 2010 federal investigation in 2010:

Oil may be seeping from Deepwater Horizon site

BP is set to embark Thursday on the fifth day of a little-known subsea mission under Coast Guard supervision to look for any new oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon disaster. The BP oil rig exploded in 2010, killing 11 workers and sending more than 7 million gallons of oil gushing into the Gulf of Mexico for three months before it was capped. In September, a new oil sheen was spotted about 50 miles off the Louisiana coast. Tests confirmed the oil came from the infamous Macondo well underneath the Deepwater Horizon. BP’s underwater vehicle observed oil seeping from the well’s containment dome and, after a remote operation, declared the leaks plugged on October 23. The company and the Coast Guard said it wasn’t feasible to clean up the slick, and that it didn’t pose a risk to the shoreline.

Slicks and sheens of varying sizes and shapes have been documented by satellite photos, as well as aerial video recorded by the non-profit environmental group “On Wings of Care.” It’s suspected that an unknown amount of oil trapped in the containment dome, and in the wreckage and equipment from 2010, could be seeping out

(via CBS News)

New Jersey.

jenbekmanprojects:

Seaside Heights, Post Sandy by Stephen Wilkes

As I flew over the area, the ocean appeared dead calm; there were no waves, the water looked as if I was in the Caribbean, not the Atlantic,” says photographer Stephen Wilkes of the November 4 helicopter ride during which he captured this eerie vision of Seaside Heights, NJ. The area was devastated by Superstorm Sandy. The Star Jet roller coaster at Casino Pier—normally a symbol of fun and frivolity—sits in the Atlantic Ocean.

This photograph is part of our Art for Sandy Relief project released in collaboration with TIME’s photo editors. All net proceeds of these editions support six local charities.

Rockaway Beach destruction.

caseyneistat:

my third and final Hurricane Sandy film. Hitch a Ride to Rockaway Beach

Though located 400 feet from the river, 8 feet above sea level, the Power House Bookshop in DUMBO was destroyed by 3 feet of flooding. It never occurred to the owners to buy flood insurance. Over 50,000 books were destroyed. The video shows how they are dealing with clean up and donations.

Via sandyhatesbooks.tumblr.com

How does PBS Newshour turn around their excellent climate reporting in such short spans of time? The first quarter of this report summarizes and sets up the climate and infrastructure issues from Hurricane Sandy. Then it moves to a rather courteous and agreeable interview with Joe Romm and Kenneth Green, writers for opposing think tanks.

I typically bristle when journalists pit “both sides” against each other, but this time it seemed to have worked - because they both agree that climate is changing and something has to be done. Their ideas to respond to climate change are complimentary, and they discuss a diversity of solutions that both government and free markets can address. The construction sector depends on government incentives, for example - you really can’t separate the two.

newshour:

Why haven’t we heard more about climate change during the national campaign?

Joseph Romm, Center for American Progress:

Well, of course, Mitt Romney gets a lot of money from fossil fuel interests. So, that’s one reason he even opposes a clean energy tax credit for wind.

Obama, I think, is just misreading the polls entirely…It’s when global warming becomes local that the public becomes concerned about it. And that’s why the polls in the last two years have shown the public is increasingly concerned, and this is particularly true of independent voters also. They are very concerned about their local pollution, but also the extreme weather that they have been seeing.

Who could miss 14 billion-dollar extreme weather disasters in this country last year and over seven this year? It’s just — you know, everyone sees the weather is going crazy, and it’s affecting them. It’s not going to be affecting a distant people in a distant land a distant time from now. It’s happening here now.

Breezy Point, Queens. 80 Homes were lost to fire caused by Hurricane Sandy.

Isaac

The Year in Volcano Activity, 36 of the best volcano shots from 2011.

Out of an estimated 1,500 active volcanoes around the world, 50 or so erupt every year, spewing steam, ash, toxic gases, and lava. In 2011, active volcanoes included Chile’s Puyehue, Japan’s Shinmoedake, Indonesia’s Lokon, Iceland’s Grímsvötn, Italy’s Etna, and recently Nyamulagira in the Democratic Republic of Congo. In Hawaii, Kilauea continues to send lava flowing toward the sea, and the ocean floor has been erupting near the Canary Islands. Collected below are scenes from the wide variety of volcanic activity on Earth over the past year.

Source: In Focus at The Atlantic

Dang. I forgot that nearly 16,000 people were killed in Japan from the tsunami.

2011: The Year in Photos, Part 1 of 3

2011 was a year of global tumult, marked by widespread social and political uprisings, economic crises, and a great deal more. We saw the fall of multiple dictators, welcomed a new country (South Sudan), witnessed our planet’s population grow to 7 billion, and watched in horror as Japan was struck by a devastating earthquake, a tsunami, and a nuclear disaster. From the Arab Spring to Los Indignados to Occupy Wall Street, citizens around the world took to the streets in massive numbers, protesting against governments and financial institutions, risking arrest, injury, and in some cases their lives. Collected here is Part 1 of a three-part photo summary of the last year, covering 2011’s first several months.

Above: A wave approaches Miyako City from the Heigawa estuary in Iwate Prefecture after the magnitude 9.0 earthquake struck the area March 11, 2011. The earthquake, the most powerful ever known to have hit Japan, combined with the massive tsunami, claimed more than 15,800 lives, devastated many eastern coastline communities, and triggered a nuclear catastrophe at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station. (Reuters/Mainichi Shimbun)

See more incredible images at In Focus

fastcompany tries to elevate disaster management with a new website, fastcoexist. Good luck with that.

A Comprehensive Guide For Cities Looking To Not Be Destroyed

(via fastcompany)

Click for porn.

revkin:

@KeithKloor: “In recent weeks, disaster porn has mutated with concerns about climate change to produce an orgy of writhing, conflated arguments.” Reminds me of an old related @dotearth post on “The Porn Factor in the Climate Fight.”

Some have argued that we should stop using Detroit as groundzero for disasterbation. I disagree. The situation in Detroit has inspired more young people to get involved with city planning, economic development, and local politics. Artists, entrepreneurs, builders, farmers, VC’s, city planners, etc., are flocking to Detroit to try to save it. Shrinking cities phenomenon has an upside and a positive outcome, and that is more civic involvement, and a better quality of life. 

utnereader:

Anyone who has poked around Detroit or even just seen the now ubiquitous images of its sprawling desolation is bound to have conflicting reactions. The city is a staggering spectacle, but the question of what exactly it is you’re looking at—or, more precisely, seeing—is something of an ethical and aesthetic litmus test in an age of so many artfully composed portraits of devastation. Detroit’s photographers manage to turn suffering into a still-life. Read more …