Climate Adaptation

CLIMATE ADAPTATION

I want to punch climate change in the face. A blog about the interactions between the built environment, people, and nature.


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Unreal.

explore-blog:

How monarch butterflies find their way home – equally fascinating and breathtaking short segment from BBC’s Wonders of Life, hosted by rockstar-physicist Brian Cox.

(↬ Doobybrain)

(via explore-blog)

A polar bear struggles on thin ice. BBC

I’ve never heard of a bear cage before. Looks neat.

thepolarbearblog:

UK! New documentary series involving polar bears!
Monday 7th January BBC2 at 9:30pm is ‘The Polar Bear Family & Me’ with Scottish wildlife cameraman Gordon Buchanan.

Here’s a short clip of what’s to come on Monday.

Gnarly foam storm, Aberdeen Scotland. It’s organic material (algae or sewage) frothed up by the tide…

Full story at BBC.

How fatty bumble bees beat the cold weather in early spring.

skeptv:

Life in the Undergrowth- Clever queen bumble bees

Sir David Attenborough uses a thermal imaging camera to demonstrate the ingenious way a queen bumble bee heats up in the cold morning air to beat the insect traffic. Brilliant video from BBC animal and wildlife show ‘Life in the Undergrowth’.

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Trouble in paradise. The Maldives islands are among the most beautiful places on earth. The islands are considered by some to be ground zero for the impacts of sea level rise, and the country’s president has been a strong advocate for climate adaptation measures.

However, the islands have a dirty secret - it’s been dumping its trash and toxic chemicals into the ocean. The BBC cracks the case wide open in this sickening video report, “Apocalyptic island of waste in the Maldives.”

Enlightening video on elephant seals. Gets a bit violent at the end.

skeptv:

Life in the Freezer- Elephant Seals

Elephant seals gather on a breeding beach, and the beachmaster starts to fight off rival males. Amazing clip from BBC One’s Life in the Freezer, with David Attenborough.

Ecological Battalion: Central America's first concerted effort to seek a military-backed solution to the threats of climate change

"The eco-battalion, working in conjunction with state prosecutors and forestry officials, discovered the lumber contraband hidden under netting and brush to avoid detection from the air.

The troops are now reportedly on the trail of the criminal organisation that was extracting the wood from the jungle on riverboats.

"There are unscrupulous people who are taking advantage of the economic limitations of the people in this region.

"And in the end, it’s the outsiders who benefit while the local communities are left with the indiscriminate deforestation," says Col Nestor Lopez, the army’s chief of civil operations."

More at BBC

BBC: Hard Rain 2: Climate change adaptation in the Philippines and Viet Nam. Skip to :10.

Climate change episode of Frozen Planet won't be shown in the U.S. as viewers don't believe in global warming

csmonitor:

An episode of the BBC’s Frozen Planet documentary series that looks at climate change has been scrapped in the U.S., where many are hostile to the idea of global warming.

British viewers will see all seven episodes of the multi-million-pound nature series throughout the Autumn.

But U.S. audiences will not be shown the last episode, which looks at the threat posed by man to the natural world.

It is feared a show that preaches global warming could upset viewers in the U.S., where around half of people do not believe in climate change.

Yikes.

Climate legacy of the ‘hockey stick’

There are few more provocative symbols in the debate over global warming than the “hockey stick”.

"The hockey stick was a term coined for a chart of temperature variation over the last 1,000 years, which suggested a recent sharp rise in temperature caused by human activities.

The chart is relatively flat from the period AD 1000 to 1900, indicating that temperatures were relatively stable for this period of time. The flat part forms the stick’s “shaft”.

But after 1900, temperatures appear to shoot up, forming the hockey stick’s “blade”.

The temperature chart originates from two seminal research papers published in Nature in 1998 and Geophysical Research Letters in 1999 by Michael Mann of the University of Virginia, Ray Bradley of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and Malcolm Hughes of the University of Arizona”

Source: BBC