CLIMATE ADAPTATION

I want to punch climate change in the face. A blog about the interactions between the built environment, people, and nature.


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Posts tagged "animals"

Fish all the fish!

Thousands of Chinese trawlers rushed out into the East China Sea today after a three-month-long summer fishing moratorium ended.

These incredible images of boats setting out from a harbour in Ningbo, Zhejiang Province, show just why China harvests more fish than any other country.

Although China has one fifth of the world’s population, it consumes a third of the world’s fish - some 50million tonnes a year

Read more: Daily Mail
Asker yan-ton Asks:
Hi there! Absolutely LOVE your blog. I have a question about isolated wetlands. What is their current standing in terms of protection in the southeast?
climateadaptation climateadaptation Said:

Hey yan-ton,

Thanks for the shout out. Really appreciate it. Wetlands are important areas that support jobs, animals, plants, water quality, and many other things like human health (yes!). Wetlands are managed by a mix of private property owners (such as farmers), non-profit groups (Ducks Unlimited), and state and federal government agencies.

The US Fish and Wildlife Service (under the Dept of the Interior) and the EPA (see EPA Wetland Region 4) are the primary federal-level managers of wetlands in the southeast United States.

According to the FWS, wetlands:

… provide a multitude of ecological, economic and social benefits. They provide habitat for fish, wildlife and a variety of plants. Wetlands are nurseries for many saltwater and freshwater fishes and shellfish of commercial and recreational importance. Wetlands are also important landscape features because they hold and slowly release flood water and snow melt, recharge groundwater, recycle nutrients, and provide recreation and wildlife viewing opportunities for millions of people. FWS.

Wetlands have several layers of legal protections. The most powerful laws are:

This doesn’t mean that they are safe (they’re absolutely not safe). It means that the public can stop destruction of these important systems.

http://www.fws.gov/wetlands/system/images/ST2009cover.jpg

With that, check out the above report on the status of wetlands in the United States. It’s a comprehensive report that includes climate change and issues of protection.

Also check out Wetlands Watch. They’re a protection group that helps the public access resources on how to report violations, such as pollution, dumping, draining, and illegal poaching.

Cheers,

Michael

Birds killed per year by energy source. Via U.S. News (trigger warning, written by Alan Neuhauser).

Wind and solar kills about 300k per year. Coal, nearly 8 million. Power lines kill about 12 and 64 million birds per year.

The biggest killer of birds? House cats kill 3 billion birds per year. That’s about 375 of those black bars for coal placed end to end.

rhamphotheca:

This White-tailed Ptarmigan was spotted with her four chicks up at Logan Pass yesterday. She is part of a research study to determine changes in habitat location and breeding numbers.

White-tailed ptarmigans are well-adapted to high elevations and cool temperatures. Rising temperatures (3x the global average rise in temperature) at high elevations over the last century means change for this alpine specialist.

According to researcher David Benson, data from the ptarmigan study shows that “white-tailed ptarmigan in Glacier have changed distribution, altered habitat preferences, and perhaps on a local scale, experienced declining population numbers in late summer.” (ms)

What a beeeeautiful bird! Lives in Montana. Of course, endangered because humans.

This is one of the two toughest arguments any active environmentalist will face in their career: Environmental protection violates my property rights." The other tough argument is: "Environmental protection will cost hundreds of jobs."

There are a ton of techniques to overcome these objections (going to law school doesn’t hurt, though it’s damned expensive). The best way is to work together. I know, I know, cats and dogs, democrats and republicans, heaven and hell. But you’d be surprised at how easy it is to work together so long as each side agrees to listen to one another.

There are two books I recommend that can help you functionally overcome these objections. Both of these books start by insisting you build a strong foundation of negotiation skills. The first is Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In, the other is Overcoming Obstacles in Environmental Policymaking.They’ll also serve you well in other contexts.

sdzoo:

Even Galapagos tortoises enjoy watermelon in the summer. Watch the full video.

(via lawebloca)

llbwwb:

Philippine Tarsier | Hans Van Kerckhoven

Note the tail! Wikipedia has an excellent article on these little beasties… They’re the smallest primates and weigh the same as a candy bar.

(via alphacaeli)

chels:

jtotheizzoe:

sciencefriday:

Did you know you can tell different species of fireflies apart by their flash patterns?

Science Friday produced a killer video about firefly illumination patters, you should give it a watch below:


Out at the farm this morning, I saw a pretty little pink-headed beetle and Justin said, “Oh, that’s a lightning bug!” I’d never seen one in the daytime. And then tonight, they were all over the driveway, and one drifted by, stopped in front of my face, and flashed at me. It’s fun, now, to see what we know about these charming little buggers and how and why they glow.

OK, this is brilliant!

chels:

jtotheizzoe:

sciencefriday:

Did you know you can tell different species of fireflies apart by their flash patterns?

Science Friday produced a killer video about firefly illumination patters, you should give it a watch below:

Out at the farm this morning, I saw a pretty little pink-headed beetle and Justin said, “Oh, that’s a lightning bug!” I’d never seen one in the daytime. And then tonight, they were all over the driveway, and one drifted by, stopped in front of my face, and flashed at me. It’s fun, now, to see what we know about these charming little buggers and how and why they glow.

OK, this is brilliant!

About the snakes- they're garter snakes, and it's all for reproduction! In that horde there is one female, and the males are trying to find her. It's completely normal and happens wherever you can find these guys. That person stepping around the snakes stepped on at least three and gave them very painful deaths though. ):
climateadaptation climateadaptation Said:

Hi !

Regarding this slithery video, you’re right! It is reproduction but it’s also for hibernation and body heat efficiency. The garter snake is my home state, Massachusetts, “State Reptile”! They also converge in large numbers in New England to den in the winter, just not the thousands like in Canada. So weird and awesome!

Cheers!

Michael

PS, Check out this article on how climate change will impact American rattle snake’s habitat. Basically, it seems rattlers are too slow to adapt to rapid climate changes and may be wiped out in some areas because it has no suitable habitat to migrate to…  image

The ranges of species will have to change dramatically as a result of climate change between now and 2100 because the climate will change more than 100 times faster than the rate at which species can adapt, according to a newly published study by Indiana University researchers.

The study, which focuses on North American rattlesnakes, finds that the rate of future change in suitable habitat will be two to three orders of magnitude greater than the average change over the past 300 millennia, a time that included three major glacial cycles and significant variation in climate and temperature.

"We find that, over the next 90 years, at best these species’ ranges will change more than 100 times faster than they have during the past 320,000 years," said Michelle Lawing, lead author of the paper and a doctoral candidate in geological sciences and biology at IU Bloomington. "This rate of change is unlike anything these species have experienced, probably since their formation."

Why do tens of thousands of these snakes converge in caves every year??

NOPE

kqedscience:

Migaloo, The All-White Humpback, Makes A Rare Appearance

Migaloo, one of the only white humpback whales in the world who isn’t albino, has been spotted for the first time this year off the coast of Australia.

According to The Telegraph, Migaloo was photographed with a camera phone Tuesday morning off Green Cape in New South Wales. Oskar Peterson, founder of the White Whale Research Centre, confirmed the sighting, noting that the whale’s location matched with Migaloo’s known migratory patterns – patterns with which Migaloo’s fans have grown familiar since his first sighting in 1991.”

Learn more from io9.

Migaloo!