CLIMATE ADAPTATION

I want to punch climate change in the face. A blog about the interactions between the built environment, people, and nature.


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Posts tagged "adaptation"
Climate change poses a direct threat to the infrastructure of America that we need to stay competitive in this 21st-century economy. That means that we should see this as an opportunity to do what we should be doing anyway, and that’s modernizing our infrastructure, modernizing our roads, modernizing our bridges, power grids, our transit systems, and making sure that they’re more resilient. That’s going to be good for commerce and it’s obviously going to be good for communities.
–– President Obama, delivering remarks at the Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience Meeting, July 16, 2014

Everyone knows the climate is changing throughout the world. As the climate changes so do mankind’s living conditions - and Germany is no exception. Germany has based it’s adaptation plan on the recommendations of the UNFCCC’s IPCC 2007 report. It is implemented at the local, regional, and national levels. While it’s been slow to implement the programs, Germany’s plan serves as a model for other western states. For example, some of the bigger engineering and urban planning projects are required to take an approach that considers climate impacts over 100 years. 

See German Strategy for Adapting to Climate Change(PDF)

U.S. Dept. of Agriculture developing a Climate Super Chicken to withstand higher temperatures. Via Bloomberg

Research study summary, USDA Adapting animal production to climate change.

About the snakes- they're garter snakes, and it's all for reproduction! In that horde there is one female, and the males are trying to find her. It's completely normal and happens wherever you can find these guys. That person stepping around the snakes stepped on at least three and gave them very painful deaths though. ):
climateadaptation climateadaptation Said:

Hi !

Regarding this slithery video, you’re right! It is reproduction but it’s also for hibernation and body heat efficiency. The garter snake is my home state, Massachusetts, “State Reptile”! They also converge in large numbers in New England to den in the winter, just not the thousands like in Canada. So weird and awesome!

Cheers!

Michael

PS, Check out this article on how climate change will impact American rattle snake’s habitat. Basically, it seems rattlers are too slow to adapt to rapid climate changes and may be wiped out in some areas because it has no suitable habitat to migrate to…  image

The ranges of species will have to change dramatically as a result of climate change between now and 2100 because the climate will change more than 100 times faster than the rate at which species can adapt, according to a newly published study by Indiana University researchers.

The study, which focuses on North American rattlesnakes, finds that the rate of future change in suitable habitat will be two to three orders of magnitude greater than the average change over the past 300 millennia, a time that included three major glacial cycles and significant variation in climate and temperature.

"We find that, over the next 90 years, at best these species’ ranges will change more than 100 times faster than they have during the past 320,000 years," said Michelle Lawing, lead author of the paper and a doctoral candidate in geological sciences and biology at IU Bloomington. "This rate of change is unlike anything these species have experienced, probably since their formation."

Via www.WhiteHouse.gov

Nice Al Jazeera op-ed covers Obama’s climate resilient cities competition.

The legislature also finds that it is time to ensure that Hawaii adapts to the effects of climate change before they grow beyond our ability to prevent the worst impacts on our economy, environment, and way of life.
Hawaii Climate Adaptation Initiative Act, a rare science-based bill signed into law that creates an adaptation response system. Hawaii is vulnerable to sea-level rise, coral bleaching and fishery collapse, erosion, storms, and even drought in some areas. The language in the bill makes plain that the adaptation actions required to implement the programs must be based on sound climate science. Great day for Hawaii!

White House releases National Climate Assessment. Major climate change report with lots of doom. Here’s Obama’s science adviser scaring the crap of out Americans.

UN-CECAR invites applicants for postgraduate level courses on ‘Building Resilience to Climate Change’. The courses run from 14th October to 7th November 2014 and is held at the United Nations University headquarters in Tokyo, Japan.  The following two courses will be offered, each with duration of 2 weeks:

 
    •    Course-1: Science, Impacts and Vulnerability’
    •    Course-2: Approaches to Adaptation
 
Priority will be given to students who are currently enrolled in a postgraduate programme.  However, the courses are also open to young faculty members, researchers and practitioners who have completed master’s degree and are working in the relevant field.
 
 
Contact:

* Dr. Srikantha Herath, UNU-IAS, herath@unu.edu

* Applications procedure and acceptance policies: Ms. Wilma James, UNU-IAS, james@unu.edu


 

I’m sure some will disagree with me, but I think this is great news. For decades, U.S. taxpayers have been subsidizing insurance for private homes and businesses that have been built in dangerous, flood-prone areas. Thousands of buildings are built (and rebuilt) in coastal areas that flood and storm with incredible reliability - and taxpayers foot the bill to rebuild these buildings in the same exact, vulnerable areas.

A Florida coastal home bought in August 2012 that pays a yearly premium of $500 will rise to $4,500.

It’s unfair, dangerous, and wasteful. This insurance, called the National Flood Insurance Program, has been a colossal waste of taxpayer dollars.

Even the U.S. government admits the program is terrible: see the GAO’s raw assessment of the program, here. Now, the program is being significantly scaled back. Unfortunately, this will affect several thousand people who own property in dangerous areas. The price of flood insurance will go up substantially, and many people will have to move.

Asker Anonymous Asks:
this may be a silly question to ask, but I've always been curious - with all of the changing focus that people have had, though not everybody obviously, in education and changing practices, adoption of renewable energy and increasingly eco-friendly technologies.. is there no proof anywhere that we've been making at least a little difference? have things just seriously been skyrocketing so badly despite these little changes we see here and there?
climateadaptation climateadaptation Said:

Hey Anon,

Little to no proof. In fact, based on the evidence, the opposite is true - countries are using more resources than ever before. New technologies have barely made a difference. See here: World Energy Outlook.

US government observations agree there’s been no difference (Source):

image

See also here, where the IEA states emissions will rise exponetinally regardless of efforts to switch.

Best,

Michael

I actually work on numbers 1, 2, 3, and 7 under my current USAID contract. In fact, I just got back from Vietnam for meetings with governments on our climate change adaptation and urban planning project. 

Curious about the IPCC’s adaptation report? Here’s a free webinar discussing the report and its implications.