Climate Adaptation

CLIMATE ADAPTATION

I want to punch climate change in the face. A blog about the interactions between the built environment, people, and nature.


about.me - FAQs - Follow - Face - Ask - Donations - Climate Book Store


Killing of Environmental Activists Rises Globally

Interesting that the investigators found that “authorities and security forces” (e.g., government) are complicit. I wonder how they found this information (or if they assumed it)?Anyone have this report? If so, can you kindly send it to me?

Baby elephant learns to use its trunk to drink water.

"Why I want to kill rare black rhino" - by Corey Knowlton

Winner of black rhino hunting auction states his $350,000 will help save the species. I note this is common practice outside the U.S., and animal reserves and refuges depend on trophy hunting as a major source of funding. The fees hunters pay goes towards breeding, land use/habitat protection, and education programs.

NatGeo summed-up this (very old) practice well

According to a recent study, in the 23 African countries that allow sport hunting, 18,500 tourists pay over $200 million (U.S.) a year to hunt lions, leopards, elephants, warthogs, water buffalo, impala, and rhinos.

Private hunting operations in these countries control more than 540,000 square miles (1.4 million square kilometers) of land, the study also found. That’s 22 percent more land than is protected by national parks.

As demand for land increases with swelling human populations, some conservationists are arguing that they can garner more effective results by working with hunters and taking a hand in regulating the industry.

Sport hunting can be sustainable if carefully managed, said Peter Lindsey, a conservation biologist with the University of Zimbabwe in Harare, who led the recent study.

"Trophy hunting is of key importance to conservation in Africa by creating [financial] incentives to promote and retain wildlife as a land use over vast areas," he said.

The more interesting angle, from my point of view, is why conservation efforts to save the black rhino (and many other species) has failed so miserably. In other words, despite the many millions funneled from traditional conservation groups, why is the black rhino still rare? Overall, untold billions have been spent towards conservation efforts and yet dozens of species fall down, extinct, every month. So, for me, I’d like to see a shift in conservation management towards better and more effective practices. This would begin with a bold admission that efforts to date have failed. 

“ Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. ”

—    

Nelson Mandela

(Rest in peace)

(via scinerds)

Predicting climate-change-related disease in Africa

Basically, climate researchers are more and more incorporating disease and virus projections into climate change models. This helps to predict - and therefor preempt - future health crises.

The overall objective of QWECI was to combine state-of-the-art climate models, weather-dependent infection-control data for key African diseases, and local knowledge about population behaviour, disease, vectors and transmission patterns. The outputs could thus generate maps of infection risk appropriate to the decision-making of health professionals on the ground and the policy-making of governments in susceptible countries.

Via Phys.org

The overall objective of QWECI was to combine state-of-the-art climate models, weather-dependent infection-control data for key African diseases, and local knowledge about population behaviour, disease, vectors and transmission patterns. The outputs could thus generate maps of infection risk appropriate to the decision-making of health professionals on the ground and the policy-making of governments in susceptible countries.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-11-climate-change-related-disease-africa.html#jCp

Legalized Rhino horn? Should the world create a controlled Rhino horn market? The animal is ‘renewable’ and funds could be used to protect habitat, breed healthy populations, debunk health myths, and generally lower the illicit trading of Rhino parts.

Read more about this interesting proposal, here.

skeptv:

Wildlife Raw & Uncut Ep6 - INTERVIEW: Crew Witnesses Elephant Eaten Alive

A member of the Earth Touch camera crew who witnessed this horrific lion attack on a baby elephant sheds some light on this unusual & disturbing incident. Lions do not usually prey on elephants — but some extraordinary circumstances had pushed this desperate pride to the brink.

by Earth Touch.

Kenya Wildlife Services (KWS) rangers, veterinarians and Lewa staff remove the horn of a wild male black rhino named Sero at Lewa Wildlife conservancy on August 26, 2013.

Eleven of Lewa’s total 73 endangered black rhinos are being relocated to neighboring Borana conservancy to afford them more space. Borana currently has no rhino population and is hoping to help increase their numbers.

The horn of each relocated rhino is cut and a tracking device is fitted to monitor its movements and to help discourage poaching. Lewa has suffered severe poaching in the past. Illegally poached rhino horn is sold for large sums as an ingredient in some traditional Chinese medicine. (Carl De Souza/AFP/Getty Images)

via In Focus

Global Shark Tracker, tracks tagged sharks around the world. I played with the map and found “Albert,” a 2.9 meter, 500 lbs Great White Shark that lives off the coast of South Africa.

CIFOR Study Warns Mitigation Without Adaptation Can Heighten Climate Vulnerability

Interesting headline, but the devil is in the details. The study is 1) from a graduate student using extremely limited data gleaned by observing the behavior of a few farmers and 2) focused on a temporary, experimental economic incentive project in two remote villages in Cameroon, Africa.

From the perspective of adaptation theory, it is important for researchers to find examples of maladaptation. Maladaptation increases risks or creates new problems, rather than resolving them. For example, relocating villagers with the intention of protecting them from floods has several ill effects on their education, culture, and may even violate their human rights (for more, see here).

So, more examples of maladaptation are very much needed. However, the findings need to be compared to other behaviors, such as incentives inherent in economic development projects, education attainment, empowerment of women, etc.

The below shows an example of a handful of villagers and farmers given obscure economic incentives to change their behavior - change farming techniques, change tree harvesting techniques, and increase educational attainment, all previously passed down from generation to generation. The author concludes that the villagers have become more vulnerable to risks from climate change. But, with such abrupt disruption, distorted incentives, and short time span - all of which are correctable - I’d say this one is more than a bit premature. 

MITIGATION MAY CREATE MORE VULNERABILITY

The research focused on two villages in the rainforests of southern Cameroon that are involved in payments for ecosystem services (PES) pilot projects.

Through PES, communities receive financial or in-kind payment for preserving “services” such as water, carbon storage and biodiversity. The pilot projects in Cameroon are designed to maintain carbon stocks and biodiversity through such activities as protecting and regenerating forests, and sustainable agriculture.

In addition, the projects include components to strengthen local health and education as they relate to infrastructure.

Financed through the Congo Basin Forest Fund, the projects, which relate only to infrastructure, are implemented by the Centre for Environment and Development with support from BioclimateEconometrica and Rainforest Foundation UK.

The pilot projects were focused on reducing deforestation and conserving biodiversity, but did not necessarily consider how to help communities adapt to a changing climate, researchers found.

In fact, the study found that conditions imposed by the PES projects had major implications for livelihood activities in the village of Nkolenyeng, predominately a farming community.

For example, in light of the projects’ ban on rotational slash-and-burn crop farming – also known as swidden – the study found some older farmers are opting to clear less land rather than take up more labor-intensive clearing methods.

These decisions may ultimately affect food security and income in the village, creating more vulnerability, the study suggested.

“At my age, I have little energy to prepare my fields without burning, so for now with the project conditions I’ll prepare only a small portion,” said one 62-year-old farmer during a focus group.

Read the rest at CIFOR