CLIMATE ADAPTATION

I want to punch climate change in the face. A blog about the interactions between the built environment, people, and nature.


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Recent Tweets @climatecote
The folks at Fastcompany sarcastically pick up sea-level rise maps. Interesting that these maps are considered the “first,” but I’m pleased the problem is getting exposure. 
fastcompany:

The apocalypse! Is it coming to YOUR city?
Probably. Over 40 million people in the continental U.S. could be affected by rising sea levels in the next century, and it is all your fault.

 
Miami, New York City, and Washington D.C. are among 180 coastal cities that are all at risk of facing sea level rises of 20 feet by the year 2100, causing floods and erosion and impacting over 40 million people, according to the first large-scale study that looked at sea level rises for the entire continental United States. Miami and New Orleans alone could lose over 10% of their land by 2100.
The University of Arizona research points to global warming trends and effects in the United States that impact coastal areas inhabited by 50,000 or more people and not just those who live on or near the beach. The researchers point out that damage from sea-level rises also infiltrates through creeks, channels, adjacent low-lying areas, and inlets, which means that beach-bums are not the only ones who should be concerned.

 
Jeez, good thing global warming is a myth. (THAT’S A JOKE, IT’S NOT A MYTH.)

The folks at Fastcompany sarcastically pick up sea-level rise maps. Interesting that these maps are considered the “first,” but I’m pleased the problem is getting exposure. 

fastcompany:

The apocalypse! Is it coming to YOUR city?

Probably. Over 40 million people in the continental U.S. could be affected by rising sea levels in the next century, and it is all your fault.

Miami, New York City, and Washington D.C. are among 180 coastal cities that are all at risk of facing sea level rises of 20 feet by the year 2100, causing floods and erosion and impacting over 40 million people, according to the first large-scale study that looked at sea level rises for the entire continental United States. Miami and New Orleans alone could lose over 10% of their land by 2100.

The University of Arizona research points to global warming trends and effects in the United States that impact coastal areas inhabited by 50,000 or more people and not just those who live on or near the beach. The researchers point out that damage from sea-level rises also infiltrates through creeks, channels, adjacent low-lying areas, and inlets, which means that beach-bums are not the only ones who should be concerned.

Jeez, good thing global warming is a myth. (THAT’S A JOKE, IT’S NOT A MYTH.)