Climate Adaptation

CLIMATE ADAPTATION

I want to punch climate change in the face. A blog about the interactions between the built environment, people, and nature.


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Tim Woody, editor of Alaska Magazine, who is absolutely not a lover of PETA et al, f’n slams the use of trapping. A touching piece.
“This is no way to see a beautiful animal.
We were rambling across the Portage flats in search of a decent trail  on Saturday when my friend Mark stopped at the edge of a copse of  alders. A few feet into the brush, a large, healthy wolf lowered itself  back to the snow, exhausted and in pain, its right front leg crushed by a  steel-jawed trap.
The wolf’s struggle was evident for yards around the wooden post to  which the trap was anchored. Trampled snow was covered with splintered  wood, chunks of ice, and blood spatters. But this once-powerful animal  was done fighting. Its eyes watched us, but it was too tired to hold its  head up and track our movements. Its breathing was shallow. We wondered  how long it had been there facing its slow, painful death. There is no  state law mandating how frequently trappers must check their traplines.
We wished we had a pistol, because the scene in front of us was one  of dreadful suffering. A merciful bullet would have made everyone feel  better. There was nothing we could do except spare the wolf further  anxiety by continuing on our way.
Later, as we returned to our vehicle, we saw two men with rifles as  they carried game bags full of snowshoe hares back to their truck. They  agreed to follow Mark’s directions to the wolf, in hope of putting it  out of its misery.
The scene haunted our group of four for the rest of the day. We all hoped the hunters had found it.
I’m not a big softy when it comes to animals. I don’t much care for  dogs or cats, and I never met a juicy steak I didn’t like. If I put a  PETA sticker on my truck, it would be the one bearing fine print that  says, “People Eating Tasty Animals.” I’ve clubbed my share of salmon,  and the only reason I don’t shoot a moose every fall is that it takes  too much vacation time I’d rather spend doing something else.
But I believe in killing humanely. And what I saw on the Portage flats was anything but humane.”
Source: Alaska Magazine
Also, read about wolves connection to climate change
Previously, previously, previously, previously

Tim Woody, editor of Alaska Magazine, who is absolutely not a lover of PETA et al, f’n slams the use of trapping. A touching piece.

This is no way to see a beautiful animal.

We were rambling across the Portage flats in search of a decent trail on Saturday when my friend Mark stopped at the edge of a copse of alders. A few feet into the brush, a large, healthy wolf lowered itself back to the snow, exhausted and in pain, its right front leg crushed by a steel-jawed trap.

The wolf’s struggle was evident for yards around the wooden post to which the trap was anchored. Trampled snow was covered with splintered wood, chunks of ice, and blood spatters. But this once-powerful animal was done fighting. Its eyes watched us, but it was too tired to hold its head up and track our movements. Its breathing was shallow. We wondered how long it had been there facing its slow, painful death. There is no state law mandating how frequently trappers must check their traplines.

We wished we had a pistol, because the scene in front of us was one of dreadful suffering. A merciful bullet would have made everyone feel better. There was nothing we could do except spare the wolf further anxiety by continuing on our way.

Later, as we returned to our vehicle, we saw two men with rifles as they carried game bags full of snowshoe hares back to their truck. They agreed to follow Mark’s directions to the wolf, in hope of putting it out of its misery.

The scene haunted our group of four for the rest of the day. We all hoped the hunters had found it.

I’m not a big softy when it comes to animals. I don’t much care for dogs or cats, and I never met a juicy steak I didn’t like. If I put a PETA sticker on my truck, it would be the one bearing fine print that says, “People Eating Tasty Animals.” I’ve clubbed my share of salmon, and the only reason I don’t shoot a moose every fall is that it takes too much vacation time I’d rather spend doing something else.

But I believe in killing humanely. And what I saw on the Portage flats was anything but humane.”

Source: Alaska Magazine

Also, read about wolves connection to climate change

Previously, previously, previously, previously

  • 166 notes
  • 2 years ago
  • Nov 22, 2011
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      Fucking Wrong.
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