Climate Adaptation

CLIMATE ADAPTATION

I want to punch climate change in the face. A blog about the interactions between the built environment, people, and nature.


about.me - FAQs - Follow - Face - Ask - Donations - Climate Book Store


ecowatchorg:

Oil and Gas Giant Exxon Agrees to Its First Carbon Risk Disclosure

READ MORE on EcoWatch: http://ecowatch.com/2014/03/21/exxon-disclose-carbon-risk/

Interesting.

Nasa-funded study: industrial civilisation headed for 'irreversible collapse'?

Has anyone read this? Looking for the paper.

The paper was debunked. And, apparently, the Guardian misunderstood the paper.

Wyoming rejects science education standards over climate change

Fascinating turn in Wyoming. There are lawsuits of the content of science curricula?! Come on Wyomingites!! I work in all sorts of terribly governed countries, none of them - NOT ONE - has any issues with science. In fact, they embrace science with intense curiosity, hope, and energy.

Worm Moon Tonight

zoetica:

Tonight’s full Moon has a special name—the Worm Moon. It signals the coming of northern spring, a thawing of the soil, and the first stirrings of earthworms in long-dormant gardens. Step outside tonight and behold the wakening landscape.” Realtime moon image gallery. (Source)

This is awesome.

Why is it important to publish in a nonprofit journal?

Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene is one of my favorite science journals. All articles are open-source - meaning they’re free - no registration or fees. They focus on environmental scientific research in an “era of accelerated human impact.” Humans have disturbed virtually every natural system on earth.

So, how do we share knowledge about scientific research? Currently, there’s a maturing debate about whether scientific research should be free or paid. I’m quite interested in this debate. Especially since my tax dollars pay for much of this research, but I don’t have access to it. In fact, most science is publicly funded by taxpayer dollars typically through universities and direct government grants. The balance of journals get their funds from subscriptions, which average about $5,000 per year. Yes, you can subscribe to Scientific American for $25, yet the annual ‘script for the Journal of Coordination Chemistry is $11,000!

When a researcher publishes their findings, scientific journals charge the public very high fees for access, which prevents the majority of the world from learning more.

I think this is reasonably indefensible.

One article from the journal Nature typically costs $20 to $30. One of my articles published with International Journal of Climate Change costs $10 (I share it for free with those that ask).

The debate is so powerful that The Guardian newspaper created a special section called Open Source Scientific Publishing. It focuses on the changing landscape of scientific publishing, and the debates make for fun, if not serious, reading.

And there is a protest movement by senior scientists to boycott some of the bigger scientific journals in favor of open source, free access publications. The University of California has also joined the fight, protesting these high fees.

Some have argued that science journals are more interested in selling subscriptions, where they favor “superstar” researchers who can capture more fees over less flashy researchers. Competition among science journals is a surprisingly ugly business.

So, should science be free? I think so.

For my part, I favor peer-reviewed, open-source science publication generally, and the journal Elementa specifically. Elementa is a non-profit publisher of science with overlap in my field of climate change and climate adaptation. The partners are BioOne, Dartmouth, the Georgia Institute of Technology, the University of Colorado Boulder, the University of Michigan, and the University of Washington.

Take a minute to read what the editors of Elementa have to say about why open source science matters and why it should be free to everyone.

Neato wave clouds caught on video in Utah. Science, here.

Life on Mekong Faces Threats As Major Dams Begin to Rise by Joshua Zaffos: Yale Environment 360

This is what progress looks like.More at Yale360.

rhamphotheca:

Endangered Tortoises Are Being Defaced on Purpose… to Protect Them

by Sabrina Elfarra

Some of the rarest tortoises in the world are a hot commodity on the black market for their unique golden shells which can sell for tens of thousands of dollars.

In an effort to obstruct poachers, conservationists have made the bold move to carve into the shells of the tortoises, protecting the animals by making their domes less attractive.  The branded shells also make it easier for authorities to trace them if they are stolen.

“Endangered tortoises and turtles are facing a real threat, and we’re hoping that this will be an effective tool to keep them safe,” Eric Goode, the founder and president of the Turtle Conservancy told ABC News today.

Years of hunting have caused near extinction for many tortoise species, so sanctuaries and zoos are using identification marks, including laser inscribing, tattoos and engraving to hinder poachers and discourage collectors from paying a great deal of money for the animals.

Since the conservancy began putting the branded tortoises back into the wild in 2011, the shells have not come up in the black market, which officials believe is a good sign.

The Turtle Conservancy’s Behler Chelonian Center in Ventura County, Calif., has been working with ploughshare tortoises among others which originate from Madagascar. Their goal is to engrave the shells of both the ploughshares in captivity as well as those living in the wild…

(read more: ABCNews)

photos by The Turtle Conservancy

I am currently on the job market and became interested in some of the different climate change divisions oil companies have adopted. Unfortunately, I haven't seen many job openings that employ people with previous climate specialized work. Are we seeing a downward trend of these hires (if there were any..) or is the work just being outsourced to other groups. Wondering where I should look for these kind of jobs in the oil and gas sector.

A question by Anonymous

Hey Anon, There are a lot of jobs. Networking (like this) certainly helps. I’d check out environmental compliance, EHS, and maybe geology and soil testing jobs in the O&G sector. Also, check out RigZone.com. They have a good directory of O&G cos that you can research. Good luck! Michael

Video: Decline of very old ice in the Arctic, 1987-2013.

Usually, the Iditarod dogsled race in Alaska is a snow-packed spectacle. This year, not so much. Check out more pics of the doggies and bare ground dilemma, here.